Teaching AFTER the Election

What is our civic responsibility as educators after the presidential election on Nov. 3rd? This is a difficult question to consider at a time when tensions are high, certainty is low, and our energy is waning.

How will we integrate this moment into our courses or class discussions? Should we? What if we didn’t? What if we did? Here at CAFE, we know that faculty across campus and across the country are asking

these same questions.  So, our staff decided to pull together resources that might be helpful as we prepare for November 4th.

As you know, this election feels different than previous cycles. Consideration of how election outcomes could affect our community are reflected well in the article, Preparing to Teach about the 2020 Election (and After):

The high stakes of the 2020 Election are deeply felt by members of our campus community and the results of this election will produce disparate impacts for students and instructors alike. When preparing to discuss the election and its results, it is important for you to consider what is ‘at stake’ for the members of the classroom community.

That statement reminds us that we cannot assume similarity of thought or impact among students, faculty, and staff post-election. You might want to check out the entire article for more information on

how classroom discussions might affect students differently. Fortunately, there are many resources that can help us teach effectively in the context of a high-stakes election.

Three resources that we found useful offer suggestions on how to discuss the value of voting Talking About Elections in Your Classroom, how to effectively Facilitate Controversial Discussions regarding the election, and

how to consider the potentially strong emotional responses that students may have after the election Teaching in Response to the Election. Some of us might be thinking that politics won’t come up in our classrooms.

While that may be true, you might find this article on how to navigate spontaneous discussions in your classroom that might otherwise catch us off guard: Guidelines for Discussing Difficult or High-Stakes Topics.

Regardless of your discipline or course topic, it is appropriate to acknowledge the moment if you wish, even if it is divergent from your planned discussions. Stanford University encourages you to ACT:

Anticipate the need to support students, Create space for students to process their reactions, and Tie current events into course learning. By doing so, we can foster meaningful discussions that help develop our citizen leaders.

Thank you for your good work in the classroom. Please contact us at CAFE if you have any questions or would like to discuss approaches to teaching after the election in more detail.

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Dynamic Learning Dialog (DLD)

Click on this link to register https://forms.gle/f69TdixY1G7wjGUB7

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Flexible Teaching and Learning Workshop Series

The Digital Education Collaborative (DEC) and the Center for Faculty Enrichment (CAFE) are offering a series of workshops to help instructors prepare courses for the fall 2020 semester. These workshops will focus on pedagogy (why we do what we do) and technology (how to use appropriate tools) for in-person, hybrid, and online teaching and learning environments

Topics include:

Course Design 101+

Flexible Learning Environments: How to Blend or Flip Your Classroom

Teaching Writing 

Teaching Speaking 

Diversity, Inclusion, Equity 

Designing Assignments and Learning Activities

Teaching, Learning and Effective Communication Practices

Collaborative Learning and Group Projects

Research with Students: Using R for Statistical Computing and Graphics

Faculty Well-Being

 

We will emphasize developing practices that are specific to your course context; therefore, prior to each session, faculty will complete a situational analysis of the course(s). Each session will be 90 minutes with the option of an additional 30 minutes small group discussion for more focused mentoring.

All workshops are 1:00pm to 2:30 pm, unless indicated otherwise. Workshop details are located @ https://blogs.longwood.edu/covid19online/dec-cafe-workshops/ .


You can register for sessions @  
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd3J2pr6HqN2egPkeFgEZzd5_QbqILb7w78eVfO1BcT39K10Q/viewform​ 

 

 

Joe Hoyle is an Associate Professor of Accounting and a Robins Teaching Fellow at the Robins School of Business at the University of Richmond.

Tuesday, February 18th, 3:30 – 4:30 PM, Blackwell Ballroom

  • Joe is an Associate Professor of Accounting and a Robins Teaching Fellow at the Robins School of Business at the University of Richmond.
  • In 2015, he was named the inaugural winner of the J. Michael and Mary Anne Cook Prize presented by the American Accounting Association for superior undergraduate teaching.
  • In 2012, he was named one of nine favorite professors in the United States by Bloomberg Businessweek.
  • Joe’s talk is open to all students, faculty, and staff.

This event is sponsored by the College of Business & Economics.

For more information, contact:  Patti Carey, careypb@longwood.edu or extension 2460​

 

Joe Hoyle Bio

Joe Hoyle is an Associate Professor of Accounting and a Robins Teaching Fellow at the Robins School of Business at the University of Richmond.  In 2015, he was named the inaugural winner of the J. Michael and Mary Anne Cook Prize presented by the American Accounting Association for superior undergraduate teaching.  In 2019, his former students created an Accounting Teaching Fellowship at the Robins School of Business that will be renamed the Joe Hoyle Accounting Teaching Fellowship upon his retirement.  His teaching blog, Getting the Most from Your Students, contains over 280 of his essays on teaching and has had more than 510,000 page views.  In 2012, he was named one of nine favorite professors in the United States by Bloomberg Businessweek.  He is a co-author with Tom Schaefer and Tim Doupnik of Advanced Accounting, a textbook which is in its 14th edition and is published by McGraw-Hill.  He is also a co-author with C. J. Skender and Leah Kratz of Financial Accounting, a textbook which is in its 3rd edition and is published by FlatWorld.  In 2007, he was named the Virginia Professor of the Year by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).  In May 2020, Professor Hoyle will complete his 49th year as a college teacher.

Welcome new faculty!

WELCOME NEW FACULTY!

Want to learn more about our new colleagues at Longwood University.  Go to http://www.longwood.edu/cafe/new-faculty-2019-2020/ and read their biographies.

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Friday’s @ CAFE Fall 2019

The Center for Faculty Enrichment (CAFE) is continuing our Fridays @ CAFE this semester.  The focus of these interactive sessions is on teaching and learning. Our goals are simple– to provide an opportunity for instructors to explore a variety teaching and learning practices and to share their ideas with colleagues. We will provide snacks and drinks.

 FALL 2019

Teaching Speaking: The Basics of Teaching and Evaluating Speaking
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, September 6, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitators:    Kris Paal, Asst. Professor, Communication Studies/CAFE Faculty Consultant,  Ronda Scarrow, Asst. Professor, Theatre/CAFE Faculty Consultant
Are you feeling anxious about having to teach and evaluate speaking in your course?  This workshop will cover basic concepts and topics for instructors who are introducing students to speaking at the undergraduate level.

  Designing Courses with Open Education Resources
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, September 13, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitators:    Mark Hamilton, Research & Digital Services LibrarianDEC and CAFE
Are you interested in using library or open education resources in your teaching?  The increased accessibility of low or no cost options for your courses not only saves student money, but can help you to tailor resources to meet course objectives and outcomes. Come see how to use your course outcomes to find, adopt, and incorporate open and library resources into your courses.

Teaching Writing: Using Writing to Teach Course Content
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, September 20, 3:15-4:45pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitator:     Heather Lettner-Rust, Assoc. Professor, English/CAFE Faculty Consultant
If you are using writing to help students think about course content, you are teaching writing. This workshop will cover how to embed writing instruction in your course while engaging students in course content.

Teaching and Facilitating Diversity and Inclusion Topics
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, September 27, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitator:     Quentin Alexander, Asst. Professor, Counselor Education/CAFE Faculty Consultant
This session is centered on different pedagogy for teaching and facilitating discussions on topics that can be sensitive and sometimes explosive in the classroom.  We will engage in role-plays as well as problem-solve case studies about issues that may present themselves when discussing critical topics in class.

 Diversity and Inclusion Toolbox of Activities for the College Classroom
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, October 4, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitator:     Quentin Alexander, Asst. Professor, Counselor Education/CAFE Faculty Consultant
This interactive workshop will focus on various activities for teaching diversity and inclusion topics in the classroom.  Presented from a developmental framework, we will engage in activities and discussions about taking students from the basic understanding of diversity and inclusion topics to complex analysis and self-reflection/examination work.

 Collaborative Learning
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, October 11, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitator:     Pam Tracy, Director, Center for Faculty Enrichment,  Adam Franssen, Asst. Director, Center for Faculty Enrichment
Effective collaborative learning is possible when instructors design teaching and learning activities and assignments that are meaningful and tied to course learning outcomes. In this session, we will discuss different approaches to incorporating collaborative learning in your courses.

Teaching Speaking: Using Speaking to Teach Course Content
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, October 18, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitators:    Kris Paal, Asst. Professor, Communication Studies/CAFE Faculty Consultant
If you are using speaking to help students think about course content, you are teaching speaking. This workshop will cover how to embed speaking instruction in your course while engaging students in course content.

 Teaching Writing: Grading and Evaluating
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, October 25, 3:00-4:30
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitator:     Heather Lettner-Rust, Assoc. Professor, English/CAFE Faculty Consultant
You’ve assigned it, they turned it in. Now what? Bring your assignment, sample student work, or simply your concerns, and we will streamline your evaluation of student writing.​

 Teaching International Students: Communicating Expectations
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, November 1, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitators:    Deborah Westin, Director, English Language Bridge Program, Center for Global Engagement
In this roundtable, we will converse about how to work with international students, how much time to spend and what to do in situations when expectations may not be clear. Unlike previous workshops on teaching international students, we will focus more on academic success and not so much on intercultural sensitivity.  Please bring situations and together, we will talk about how to handle them.

 Teaching Speaking: See It, Speak It, Critique It: Strengthening YOUR speaking skills
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, November 8, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitator:     Ronda Scarrow, Asst. Professor, Theatre/CAFE Faculty Consultant
 Join us for an informal afternoon where we will focus on strengthening your speaking skills for preparing and presenting oral presentations in a variety of situations.

 Designing Courses with Open Education Resources
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, November 15, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitators:    Mark Hamilton, Research & Digital Services LibrarianDEC and CAFÉ
Are you interested in using library or open education resources in your teaching?  The increased accessibility of low or no cost options for your courses not only saves student money, but can help you to tailor resources to meet course objectives and outcomes. Come see how to use your course outcomes to find, adopt, and incorporate open and library resources into your courses.

 Designing Courses for Face-to-Face & On-line Learning: Quality Matters and Backward Design
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, December 6, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitators:    CAFE and DEC
Get a head start on designing your intersession or spring semester courses.  In this session, we will use the principles and practices of backward design and Quality Matters to align student-learning outcomes with assignments with teaching and learning activities.

Designing Courses for Face-to-Face & On-line Learning: Quality Matters and Backward Design
To register, please click this link: register here
Friday, December 13, 3:00-4:30pm
Clark House Conference Room
Facilitators:    CAFE and DEC
Get a head start on designing your intersession or spring semester courses.   In this session, we will use the principles and practices of backward design and Quality Matters to align student-learning outcomes with assignments with teaching and learning activities.