Monthly Archives: May 2019

Quantitative Reasoning

Math 135- Mathematical Modeling of Finance

To satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning pillar I took Mathematical Modeling of Finance with Professor Stanton. The second half of this class was very useful in that it prepared me to make budgets and I learned how to break down loan agreements. This class helped me gain many useful skills that I will be able to implement when I begin to pay my own bills and take out loans. I found the topic of this class interesting and I enjoyed being able to break down numbers and apply formulas to figure out things such as interest rates and monthly payments. I think this is a very useful course that everyone should take because it helps prepare for the financial realties of adult life.

In this class we were assigned three written paper projects where we paired with partners and created a financial plan. Below I have attached my final project. The assignment was to work with a partner and make an Amortization table/schedule for an item that we desired. I worked with my partner and we each chose an object we wanted and then created separate tables. In this project the object I desired was a new car (object A).

 

Aesthetic Expressions

English 220- Intro to Dramatic Writing

During my first semester I took a dramatic writing class with Professor Carroll-Hackett that was based on writing and analyzing screenplays for short films and movies. Before taking this class I had the assumption that it was solely going to be a dramatic writing class. The biggest thing I took away was that I am definitely not a screenwriter. I learned that I prefer to write research-based papers and things that are analytical and thought provoking. While this workshopping class was very thought provoking and could be analytical at times depending on how in depth the writer was, this class was not my favorite. Mary (that’s what Professor Carroll-Hackett preferred to be called) is an incredibly interesting woman and genuinely sparked an interest in me. I was fascinated in seeing all the background work that goes into making a movie. We learned that for each page written, it equates to one minute of screen time. This fact is amazing to me because I struggled writing my 9 page short-film script and I cannot imagine writing one that is over 200 pages. I can honestly say that I have not watched a movie in the same way as I did before this class.  Even though I did not necessarily like the topic of the course and it was the source of many late nights, it prompted me to dig deep when coming up with plots. I have taken away a lot of valuable lessons from this course that go beyond screenwriting thanks to Mary.

 

We were assigned to write four scripts throughout the course of the semester, workshopping each others on a rotation schedule each week. Each week after workshopping other’s scripts and hearing feedback on mine, I gained knowledge about plot and character development and basic formatting. The most challenging part about writing a screenplay is creating the characters. Each has to have qualities and quirks that make them human and not one dimensional.  I struggled the most with this throughout the semester but through reading my classmates scripts and talking about it each class, I eventually learned how to improve my characters and what drives them. The script below is the second one I wrote for this class and I’ll admit that it’s not very good but I am not the most creative person when it comes to creating a storyline.

Scientific Reasoning

PSYC 101- Intro to Psychology

I took AP Psychology my senior year of high school and achieved a high score on the AP Exam, allowing my class to transfer as college credit.

Historical and Contemporary Insights

History 221- US History Colonial-1877

I took this class through John Brown University, during my junior year of high school. This counted as dual-enrollment credit here at Longwood University.

CTZN 110

This class was also one of my Honors requirements that I took during my first semester at Longwood.

ENGL 150

I took this class through John Brown University, during my senior year of high school. This counted as dual-enrollment credit, here at Longwood University.

Community

One of the reasons I am most proud to call myself an honors student is because of the sense of community within the program. Longwood overall has a tightly knit community that goes out of its way to evoke a welcoming and inclusive community, I believe that Honors takes this a step further. In the short time I have been a member of the CHC family,  I have built relationships with both students and faculty that are very valuable to me. Longwood makes it a point to train up citizen leaders that will take initiative and extend love and help to people in surrounding communities. The sense of true community and genuine interest in helping not only students but surrounding areas as well is what I value most about Longwood.

Honors EDUC 245

The second Honors course I took at Longwood was Human Growth and Development with Dr. Cosby. This class was focused on investigating how children advance from infancy through adolescence. I loved this class and how hands-on all of the activities were. Each time we met there was some sort of activity for the day. Dr. Cosby did a wonderful job at engaging all of the students and making sure that concepts were grasped before we moved on. Our grades were comprised of quizzes, tests, class activities, daily attendance, and four projects. While this class was heavy in course work, each and every activity was applicable to what we had been learning throughout the semester. One of our four projects was to design an inquiry-based study on any topic we wanted relating to child development. Below I have attached my Inquiry-Based Project.

The topic I chose to research for my Inquiry-Based Project was the effects that having a terminally ill sibling has on child development. Designing three research questions and conducting research through reading scholarly, peer-reviewed articles, I was able to determine both the positive and the negative effects this has on a child throughout their developmental years. After research, I used the theories and theorists of child development and applied and compared them to my findings. I enjoyed this project because Dr. Cosby gave us the freedom of choosing a topic that interested us. This project allowed me to reflect on all the material I had learned throughout the semester and apply it to a modern day, real life. situation. Having teaching be my future profession, I gained many valuable skills in how to work with children in this particular situation.

Author: Payten Bovat

Title: Inquiry Based Project: Developmental Effects of Having a Terminally Ill Sibling

Date: April 9, 2019

 

Honors CTZN 110

The first Honors course I took at Longwood was CTZN 110 with Dr. Dudley-Shotwell. This course was labeled Bodies and Citizens and it was largely related to women and gender studies. I did not particularly enjoy this course as it was contrary to many of my beliefs, but after the conclusion of the semester I felt well-educated on many topics that I had not previously been exposed to. The formatting of this class was unique and not what I expected of a college course. I very much enjoyed that each class time we met there was student lead discussion on the articles we had annotated for that week. Our grades in the class were taken from our weekly annotations and class discussions. I appreciate that participation was taken into account when grades were given. Our ability to analyze and effectively communicate the main concepts of articles played a key role in our course grade.

As a final project for the class we were prompted to design a course syllabus on a topic that interested us. We were able to use a topic that we had discussed in class or choose one of our own. Below I have attached my final project on illegal immigrants and their effects on the American healthcare system. I loved doing this project because it prompted me to do a lot of research and educate myself.

Author: Payten Bovat

Title: Illegal Immigrants in the Healthcare System

Date: December 2018