A&P new tutoring hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:00 -6:00 p.m. in Brock Hall, room 103

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AUDITIONS!  SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD

Next Wednesday, February 1st.  Wygal Auditorium.  6:00 PM – 8:30 PM

(The Director of Crimes is willing to make arrangements for those in the cast of Crimes to be able to audition for Songs)

READ BELOW from, Musical Director, Dr. Chris Swanson for Audition Songs and other singing information!

Sheet Music for each song is available in PDF, or limited printed copies

EMAIL Bruce Speas (speasbo@longwood.edu) for PDF files or copies.  Specify for Woman 1 or 2, Man 1 or 2.

Welcome singers and actors to the auditions for Songs for a New World. To prepare for your audition, be ready to sing one of the following cuts:

Audition songs:

Woman 1

1.4, “I’m not Afraid”, mm. 1-27

 Or

2.11, “I’d Give it all for You”, mm. 47-84

Plus vocalization (Range: F#3-Ab6)

Woman 2

1.3, “Just One Step” mm. 1-80

 Or

2.14, “The Flagmaker,” 1775, mm. 1-27

Plus vocalization (Range: F3-F5)

Man 1

1.2, “Opening Sequence II: On the Deck of a Spanish Sailing Ship, 1492” mm. 1-43

 or

2.12 “King of the World” mm. 9-42

Plus vocalization (Range D3-C5 (F5))

Man 2

1.7, “She Cries,” mm. 5-54

 Or

2.13, “I’d Give it All for You,” mm. 8-44

                  Plus vocalization (Range F#2-C5)


Important notes:

– You may also be asked to vocalize through your range during the audition. 

– Songs do not need to be memorized for this audition. 

– Some songs are very high, especially those assigned to “Man 1.” In some cases we may make musical adjustments to fit the needs and abilities of our cast.

– Although this show was originally conceived for four singers this production may cast up to eight singers to share the 17 songs. The list below shows how the songs are cast according to the score and the original off-broadway recording. Keep in mind that, depending on our cast, we may assign songs, or parts of songs, differently. 

– If you have questions about the music or about preparing the music for the auditions, contact Dr. Chris Swanson (swansoncl@longwood.edu, Wygal 221)

Woman 1, 13 songs (5 extended solos)

        Range: F#3-Ab6

1.1  Opening Sequence I: The New World, ensemble

1.2  Opening Sequence II: On the Deck of a Spanish Sailing Ship, 1492, ensemble

1.4 I’m not Afraid, solo

1.5 The River Won’t Flow, ensemble

1.5a Transition to “Stars and the Moon”, solo

1.6 Stars and the Moon, solo

1.8 Steam Train, ensemble

2.9 The World was Dancing, ensemble

2.11 Christmas Lullaby, solo

2.13 I’d Give it All for You, duet

2.15 Flying Home, ensemble

2.16 Final Transition: The New World, ensemble

2.17 Hear my Song, ensemble

Woman 2 11 songs (3 extended solos)

        Range: F3-F5

1.1  Opening Sequence I: The New World, ensemble

1.2  Opening Sequence II: On the Deck of a Spanish Sailing Ship, 1492, ensemble

1.3  Just One Step, solo

1.5  The River Won’t Flow, ensemble

1.8 Steam Train, ensemble

2.9 The World was Dancing, ensemble

2.10 Surabaya Santa, solo

2.14 The Flagmaker, 1775, solo

2.15 Flying Home, ensemble

2.16 Final Transition: The New World, ensemble

2.17 Hear my Song, ensemble

Man 1 10 songs (5 extended solos)

        Range D3-C5 (F5)

1.1  Opening Sequence I: The New World, ensemble

1.2  Opening Sequence II: On the Deck of a Spanish Sailing Ship, 1492, featured solo

1.5  The River Won’t Flow, ensemble

1.8 Steam Train, featured solo

2.9 The World was Dancing, ensemble

2.12 King of the World, solo

2.13a Transition into “The Flagmaker”, solo

2.15 Flying Home, featured solo

2.16 Final Transition: The New World, ensemble

2.17 Hear my Song, ensemble

Man 2 10 songs (3 extended solos)

        Range F#2-C5

1.1  Opening Sequence I: The New World, ensemble

1.2  Opening Sequence II: On the Deck of a Spanish Sailing Ship, 1492, ensemble

1.1  The River Won’t Flow, ensemble

1.7 She Cries, solo

1.8 Steam Train, ensemble

2.9 The World was Dancing, featured solo

2.13 I’d Give it All for You, duet

2.15 Flying Home, ensemble

2.16 Final Transition: The New World, ensemble

2.17 Hear my Song, ensemble

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Free safety training available to students

Because it’s a top priority here at Longwood, we’re always looking for ways to be proactive when it comes to your student’s safety.

An email went out to students today letting them know about a training opportunity where they can learn more about how to be safe in different situations.

This free Code Red training is being offered by the Longwood Police Department and Office of Emergency Management, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The training will cover what steps to take in an active threat situation and severe weather emergencies.

A total of 12 sessions will be offered here on campus: six each on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31.

The training will last approximately 90 minutes and will be led by LUPD staff, Emergency Management Coordinator Tracie Giles ’94 and Jamie Finney ’98, a supervisory protective security advisor for the Department of Homeland Security Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency.

Students will be welcomed into each session on a first-come, first-served basis. Sessions are limited to 25 participants each.

If you or your student has questions about the Code Red training, you can email Tracie Giles, emergency management coordinator, at police@longwood.edu.

—Sabrina Brown

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CSDS430

I chose to enhance one of my major classes- CSDS430: Language and Literacy. This class was all about the importance of literacy in children’s linguistic development, and all that goes into learning to read, speak, and/or communicate. I enjoyed this class especially because I have an interest in literacy specialization as a potential career path, and learning all that goes into being “literate” was very interesting. We broke down what literacy meant, going all the way back to phonological awareness, text awareness, and morphological awareness. All-in-all, this was a really interesting class that taught us about issues that are occurring all around us, and what we can do to hopefully combat them.

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Sociology Class Reflections

In my Stress and Crisis in the family class we reflected on how Incarceration can affect family stress discussing criminal justice and family institutions. In this reflection I discussed how incarceration contributes to a lot of stress such as disenfranchised grief, that incarceration is basically an ambiguous loss of a family member, and the stress that a child faces with an incarcerated parent. This class was one of my first few sociology classes so this reflection just touches the surface of what it means to think and write in a sociological manner. The structure of this reflection is formal in nature. I discuss the effects of Incarceration and the criminal justice system of families and children in stages such as early childhood, teenage years, and adulthood. Something I love about my writing on this reflection is that I propose social policy changes to help make incarceration less burdensome on the family structure. Overall, I think this is a very solid introduction writing into what it means to think sociologically about the Criminal justice system as a social institution. In my race and racism class we discussed the family institution in regards to gender and sexuality. This writing is more sociological as I took this class later in my educational path and had a better understanding of key concepts such as gender being socially constructed, analyzing and reflecting on the effects of gender and sexuality, and social perspectives such as the conflict perspective. In my Race and Racism class we also discussed and reflected on the criminal justice system. In this reflection my writing has become more sociological and stronger in nature as I am able to connect my learning across multiple disciplines such as political science, sociology, and history. I was able to connect key connections of social phenomena, racial ideologies, and the history of inequality to reflect upon the devastating impacts of the criminal justice system on families of color.

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Sociology

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About me

Student Government
Professional Headshots

My name is Davice Madelyn Jones and I am a senior Biology major with a Chemistry minor. I am a aspiring general dentist.

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Response to My Letter to my Senior Self

Dear past,

I have progressed tremendously and feel more confident in my teaching abilities. I have had successful internships and jobs in educating others. I am not in as many clubs and organizations as I was in freshman year, but my relationships with past members still stand. I have made new friends in Longwood’s Gaming club and grown closer to the people in SPED Ambassadors. I am grateful to the many opportunities I have been given and will continue to finish out my college career strong.

I have worked a couple of jobs and learned from my several traveling experiences. I recognize that I have more to learn and how learning is never finished. I am looking forward to what lies ahead but I will be ready to meet challenges with the skills I have developed.

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Names have meanings

Over time the world has changed and as people of society we need to be alright with change. Slowly we are starting to recognize situations, names, statues in the world and what they used to stand for. For example, getting rid of statues of people who went against The Civil Rights. As a society we saw that we do not need to be walking past these statues every day. It represents bad history and to change we had to take them down. Show we do not land for this, and we will not look at it. The people who are the statues we learn about in school, and we learn the harm they did. Though we do not talk about in schools what names represents. Meaning behind names and what they used to stand for. 

Though as a society we are slowly starting to recognize and act on it. The Washington Compandor’s football team is a great example on how our society has changed. As well as showing how as a society we were unaware for so long a meaning of a word. For the longest time the Washington Compandors were called The Washington Redskins because nobody stopped and looked at the meaning behind the name. The average person just sees a football team with a name nothing more. Though as a society we needed to take a step back and see all the details behind the name. At least before we hop on and supported them, we should know what they stand for. A name is what you are known for and the meaning behind the name should be known. All people see is a name nothing more, but for the American Indian community the name has terrible meaning. 

The name redskin’s is a racial slur that was used towards American Indians. Though most people know the name for the football team. Though it shows how people do not stop and look at a meaning behind a word before they jump on it. Therefore, The Washington Compandors had to do damage control and fix their horrible mistake. The team did do the right thing and change the name, though it took them a while. Though again thew whole team has a branding team and how did they not know about the meaning behind the name. Even having strikes and potations to change the name. The team should have been more on top of what was going on as well as do more action. As well as putting a statement and video to explain the harm in the name and the history behind it. The name changes and the steps in place make it so this was a teaching moment for everyone. This was the time where everyone needs to be educated on names and meanings. 

The Washington Commanders went on to rebranding the whole team. Even allowing the fans to help choice the name. The team did a lot of damage control. Though this incident could have ruined and bankrupted the whole team. Though instead the whole situation was a teaching moment for everyone and for the future. To be more aware and do your research. 

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A longtime professor’s view of a simple way students can be successful in college

I’ve never shared a link to an article in Parent Pipeline before—and I won’t do it again if you let me know this isn’t the kind of content you find helpful—but I saw something in the New York Times this week that I thought was interesting and illuminating.

Written by a longtime professor (though not one at Longwood), the article addresses what success in college looks like and the simple thing students can do to achieve it.

It’s easy to think of college as job training—and that is an important aspect, writes the article’s author. However, something that will last much longer than the skills needed in today’s job market is the desire and willingness to learn, he says:

“To an overwhelming degree, students today see college as job training, the avenue to a stable career. They are not wrong, given the 70 percent wage premium for 22- to 27-year-old workers with a bachelor’s degree over those with only a high school diploma. But this orientation can close students off from learning things that don’t obviously help their job prospects. …

“The human mind, though, is capable of much more than a job will demand of it. Those ‘useless’ classes like philosophy, literature, astronomy and music have much to teach. I haven’t had to solve a calculus problem in 25 years. But learning to do so expanded my brain in ways that can’t simply be reduced to a checklist of job skills. Living in the world in this expanded way is a permanent gift.”

Here’s a link to the full article. You should be able to access it, even if you don’t have a Times subscription, as along as you haven’t yet used all of your free views for the month: https://www.nytimes.com/2023/01/03/opinion/college-learning-students-success.html?smid=url-share

I’d be very appreciative of any feedback you’d be willing to share about this article and/or the kind of content you’d most like to see in Parent Pipeline. Please feel free to email me at browncs2@longwood.edu.

Back to Campus and Basketball

For those of you who are bringing your students back to campus this coming Saturday, Jan. 7, you might want to consider sticking around for the men’s basketball game vs. Winthrop at 4 p.m. It promises to be an exciting contest, with Longwood so far undefeated in the Big South after four conference games. The game is in Willett Hall. General admission tickets are $8.

Also, spring semester classes begin on Wednesday, Jan. 11.

All the best to you and your family in 2023!

—Sabrina Brown

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