June’s New Reading

In order to bring you new and fun recreational reads, the Greenwood Library participates in a book leasing program through McNaughton. These titles are shelved on the small bookcases in the middle of the Atrium and are designated with green labels. You can browse the entire collection here and if you’re interested in what’s new, look out below!

Sparks like Stars by Nadia HashimiSorrowland by Rivers SolomonThe Happiest Man on Earth: The Beautiful Life of an Auschwitz Survivor by Eddie JakuThe Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila HarrisPreventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response by Andy SlavittShape: The Hidden Geometry of Information, Biology, Strategy, Democracy, and Everything Else by Jordan EllenbergFreedom by Sebastian JungerThe Thursday Murder Club by Richard OsmanSharks in the Time of Saviors by Kawai Strong WashburnUnsettled Ground by Claire FullerThe Paris Library by Janet Skeslien CharlesProject Hail Mary by Andy WeirDowneast: Five Maine Girls and the Unseen Story of Rural America by Gigi GeorgesInstructions for Dancing by Nicola YoonSomebody's Daughter: a Memoir by Ashley C. FordPunch Me Up to the Gods by Brian BroomeAll that She Carried: The Journey of Ashley's Sack, a Black Family Keepsake by Tiya MilesHow Lucky by Will LeitchSurvive the night by Riley SagerThe Man Who Lived Underground by Richard WrightThe Maidens by Alex Michaelides
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5.7 update

Hi all! Today we are upgrading to wordpress 5.7 (along with updates to plugins and themes). Check out the details here:

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Making Good on Our Commitment to Affordability: Tuition remains the same as last year

Making good on Longwood’s commitment to affordability, the Board of Visitors (the university’s governing body) decided at their most recent meeting that there would be no increase in tuition this year, making this the second time in three years that Longwood’s budget has not included a tuition increase.

Longwood’s average percentage increase in tuition over recent years is one of the very lowest among Virginia public universities—an average of 3 percent per year since 2014.

Overall, we hope this is good news for your family.

Specifically, annual in-state, full-time tuition (12-18 credit hours per semester) in 2021-22 will be the same as in 2019-20 and 2020-21:
In-state annual tuition
$8,180

The university has restructured full-time, out-of-state tuition for 2021-22 (12-18 credit hours per semester), resetting both tuition and scholarship award amounts. The net result of this adjustment is that out-of-state, full-time tuition costs, with scholarship awards taken into consideration, will remain flat in 2021-22 as well.
Out-of-state annual tuition
$20,000

There will be a small increase in the comprehensive fee for next year, 3.14 percent, for both in-state and out-of-state students. This fee funds auxiliary operations including health services, student activities, career services and recreation opportunities.

Costs for meal plans and housing were set earlier this year.

The 2021-22 academic year includes substantial support for the financial needs of students, addressing a need for families impacted by Covid-19. More than $17.5 million will be given to students in financial support in the 2021-22 academic year.

“Longwood recognizes the impact the last year has had on family budgets, and we maintain our commitment to keeping college affordable,” said President W. Taylor Reveley IV. “We have examined every area of the university for savings and efficiencies with the goal in mind of keeping tuition flat again for our students. With support from the governor and General Assembly, we’ve made real progress and will continue to work on our students’ and families’ behalf on college affordability.”

—Sabrina Brown

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Working toward a return to “normal” this fall: Covid-19 vaccinations for students

I wanted to be sure you were aware of the email that went out yesterday (Wednesday, June 9) to students attending Longwood this fall letting them know that they will be required to have a Covid-19 vaccination.

Here are some of the key points from the email:
—The American College Health Association’s latest guidance states clearly: “With comprehensive vaccination, indoor classes, group sizes, residence hall occupancy, eating establishment operations, and sporting events may default to pre-pandemic guidance.”
—If the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has not granted full approval to at least one of the vaccines by July 15, we will extend the deadline for this requirement.
—Several other Virginia universities have instituted a similar vaccination requirement, and, like those other universities, Longwood will allow religious and medical exemptions, as we do with other required vaccines.
—Students who do not confirm vaccination, for whatever reason, may be subject to several Covid-19 precautions based on current guidance from the commonwealth.
—All incoming and returning students will receive by the end of July a link to a short, straightforward web form that will ask them either to confirm that they have been vaccinated, or accept the conditions.
—If you have questions, email questions@longwood.edu.

Below is the complete text of the email sent to your student Wednesday, June 9:

Dear Students,

Over this past 15 months, we have successfully navigated the Covid-19 pandemic by stepping up as a community—looking out not just for ourselves, but for one another. We have also come to appreciate how extraordinarily important it is to be together in person. When we gather fully again this fall, we will all be eager to put the burdensome restrictions of this past year behind us.

Official guidance from the CDC and others makes clear the pathway to a normal year is vaccinations. As the American College Health Association’s latest guidance states clearly: “With comprehensive vaccination, indoor classes, group sizes, residence hall occupancy, eating establishment operations, and sporting events may default to pre-pandemic guidance.”

That is why I am sharing the news today of Longwood’s decision to require students on campus to be vaccinated for Covid-19. The requirement will be added to our existing and longstanding vaccination requirements for the coming academic year. It does not apply to online-only students who are not on campus.

Like other Virginia universities, we will allow religious and medical exemptions, as we do with other required vaccines.

If you do not confirm you are vaccinated, for any reason, you will still be allowed to register and come to campus. However, all students (including those completing student teaching) who do not certify they are vaccinated will need to sign a form acknowledging they may be subject while on campus to masking requirements, mandatory testing or restrictions on certain activities, including many social activities. If unvaccinated, you will also likely be required to quarantine for up to two weeks if contact exposed to a positive case (which is no longer the case for anyone who is vaccinated).

All incoming and returning students will receive by the end of July a link to a short, straightforward web form that will ask them either to confirm that they have been vaccinated, or accept the conditions.

We recognize some people may prefer to wait to be vaccinated until the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has moved at least one of the approved vaccines out of the current Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) status and given it full approval. We don’t know exactly when that might take place—it could be a matter of days, weeks or months before the required review of long-term safety data is complete. If such approval has not been granted by July 15, we will extend the deadline for this requirement.

Following direction provided by the Commonwealth for state employees, and recognizing a range of individual circumstances, we are encouraging but not mandating vaccinations for Longwood employees.

In closing, like virtually every university, Longwood already requires a number of vaccinations for communicable diseases, with reasonable exemptions. The reasoning for all of them is the same: We live, work, and study together—and a critical mass of our community being vaccinated protects all of us, not just the recipient.

Covid-19 vaccines have now been administered with extraordinary safety and efficacy more than 2 billion times globally, and are driving down cases and hospitalizations across the U.S. and elsewhere. They are the tool that will allow us all to return to normal—and that will be the case here on campus this fall, too.

Thank you. Be on the lookout for further communication about the web link next month. If you have questions, you can email questions@longwood.edu.

Matthew McWilliams
Assistant Vice President for Communications
Longwood University

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Junior Year

June 2021

Hey blog, quick update … Well I made it through junior year and a pandemic, something I am truly grateful for because not everyone was as fortunate. COVID-19 took more than half a million lives and cost millions of jobs.

This past year I added a homeland security minor, a criminal justice minor, and a pre-law concentration. I completed an honors research project that delve into Russian election interference, comparing current tactics to those originating during the Cold War and the 2016 presidential election.

2020 brought many challenges but also provided me with the opportunity to grow closer with my two roommates and best friends. Here are a few pictures from this year!

My dog Bean turned 1!

I scored my first goal and had an assist this year!

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Professional Development

I have not attended any conferences this year, but it has been a huge year in terms of my own professional development. I took MANG 391 with Professor Carey, which helped me greatly to learn how to act both in and out of the workplace. The biggest thing that I did in that class that is still impacting me was creating a LinkedIn profile that I still actively use and update. Professor Carey helped me with many skills, and I believe that had I not taken this class with her, I would not have the internship I do for the summer. I have attached a link to my LinkedIn profile that shows how I have developed as a professional this year.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/woodruffgb/

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Cyber Security 1 Enhancement

In the fall of 2020, the first semester of my junior year, I took ISCS 376: Cyber Security 1. This was the first upper level class of my concentration that I took, so I was very excited about it. Through it, I learned a lot and was always very excited for every class. I learned about many types of security and how to apply them, as well as about some historical attacks on companies that we can now learn from. I chose to work with Dr. Poe on my enhancement, and I wrote a paper about Denial of Service attacks, how they are caused, and how to prevent them in the future. This entire class very much set the stage for the internship I will be doing this summer, as well as set the tone for my major, which I am very excited for after taking this class. Attached to this I have included the paper I wrote for this class.

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Honors Business Ethics

This course taught me a lot about being responsible for my actions as well as taking responsibility for wrong doing. I will definitely be taking what I learned an applying to my future job after Graduation. What I learned most was how to make proper decisions regarding right and wrong actions.

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NURS 370

This class was my Older Adult class where we discussed the care of older adults. For my honors enhancement, I partnered up with two of my other classmates and we conduced a project regarding the effect of COVID-19 on the elderly population, specifically within the Woodlands Nursing Home in Farmville, VA. This class broadened my horizon on the care of older adults. While I was not against working with this population, it has never been something I really wanted to do, but now after having takin this class, I am more open to the idea of doing so. This project connect current events with necessary knowledge allowing me to see what I have learned first hand. In class, we always talk about how important certain things are to the elderly such as socialization, but this project really emphasized that. I am glad that I not only have the knowledge that this class has taught me, but also the drive to keep learning about the effects on the elderly population post COVID-19.

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NURS 315

This class was my nutrition class. The honors enhancement for this class was partnered with pharmacology (NURS 320). There was a joint class project that can be seen under the NURS 320 post. However, for this class specifically, I decided to share a different project that took place just within this course. For this project that lasted a total of 6 weeks, I had to make note of everything I ate and drank including all of the nutrients. A lot went into this project and it really showed on paper just how important taking care of yourself through nutrition and healthy habits really is. I learned a lot in this class, but more so, I think I learned a lot in clinical after being able to apply my knowledge I gained from this class.

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