Teen Pregnancy

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Resisting Sex Education

The word resist means, to withstand, strive against, or oppose. (dictionary.com) In context this means if someone was against a certain thing then they would resist it or go agasint that particular situation. In the case of sex education, being that there are two types that I am talking about, more than likely some people are going to resist one more than the other. Since I am fighting for comprehensive education to be taught in schools, I am going to talk about the reasons why people may resist the option for this type of sex education to be allowed in schools.

First of all, the people that would resist the change from abstinence-only sex education to comprehensive sex education would be the teenagers parents or people who do not believe all areas containing to sex should be taguht in schools. The reasons for this would be because, in the parents mind, they want to keep their child away from knowing all the aspects relating to sex for as long as they can; the parents want their child to only know about the basics of sex. Religious values might also play a role when it comes to sex education. When dealing with religious beliefs more than likely they believe that they should remain a virgin until marriage. In this case a parent might resist comprehensive sex education due to the fact that it goes into detail, condoms, birth control, STD’s, etc. These were the main issues I could find of why parents would resist comprehensive sex education. I could not find much on money, I know that the goverment pays for sex education so the schools  have to adbide by the goverments rules. I found that more and more schools are starting to teach about sexually transmitted diseases, which goes along with the comprehsive education curriculum. With that said, I do not see where the government would be an issue.

Hopefully there is not much resisting with the comprehensive sex education program because it truly is what is best for the students and we should all want what is best for them.

posted by McKenzie Davis in Uncategorized and having 1 Comment

Successful Sex

There has been an ongoing debate for years about which type of sexual education is most beneficial for teenagers. The two types of education are abstinence-only sex education and comprehensive sex education. Abstinence-only sex education is the type of education that is being taught in schools around the United States.

My concern with abstinence-only education is that it is not teaching kids all that they need to know about sex. Abstinence only education only teaches students to not engage in sexually activity. It teaches nothing about condoms, birth control, or types of sexually transmitted diseases.  The way kids are experimenting with sex these days it is important that students are aware of all aspects relating to sex. That is why comprehensive sex education should be taught in schools today. This type of educaton teaches students about condoms, birth control, and about sexually transmitted diseases.  “More than 140 national organizations acknowledge that comprehensive sex education can effectively address adolescents’ sexual health needs. There support is based upon numerous finding that comprehensive sex education effectively promotes abstinence and may delay sexual debut, reduce sexual frequency, reduce the number of sexual partners, reduce STD risk, and increase the likelihood of consistent contraceptive use.” (Reece 173.)

It is important that our students get the most effective form of education that they can. That is why it is important that changes are made within the schools. The first thing that needs to happen is make sure that everyone has the correct understanding about both of the types of sex education. A presentation needs to be made at a public event that involove the schools such as a school orientation. Once parents, educators, and the school board knows which type of education results in the lowest teen pregnancy rate they will know that comprehensive sex education is the best type of education for the students. Once this is done the school board will need to take action and adopt the comprehensive sex education program. After this, the whole nation will see the teen pregnancy rate decrease. Studies show that comprehensive sex education works to bring down teen pregnancy. Once schools figure that out the whole world will know.

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A more focused view on Teen Pregnancy

Most teen pregnancies are unplanned and unexpected. Teenagers spend a lot of their time at schools, this being where they receive the bulk of their education. With that being said it is very important that every teen receives a well developed sex education program. Schools in the Richmond area are teaching through a method known as abstinence-only sex education. This program only teaches students to refrain from engaging in sexual activity; it doesn’t teach about sexually transmitted diseases or the use of contraceptives. This method does not seem as affective because it does not teach the ways to prevent unexpected/unplanned pregnancies. There is another sex education known as comprehensive sex education. This method teaches students the importance of using condoms or birth control if they are sexually active even though it is encouraged to remain abstinent from sex. With students having this knowledge the number of teen pregnancies would decrease dramatically. There was a study done a few years ago, the study consisted of having teachers fill out a survey about how they believed sex education should be taught. The majority of the teachers responded that they teach their kids to be abstinent but feel that teaching about condoms and other contraceptives is very important and would lower the amount of teen pregnancies around the United States.

Students are having to find out about condoms or birth control on their own; some find out through their parents but most teens find out from their friends. It is important that this kind of information is given correctly so the best way is to teach it through comprehensive education.

In Richmond there were 600 teen pregnancies in 2011, this number decreased from 2010 where there were about 620 teen pregnancies. The chart below shows the rates of teen pregnancy from teens between 10 and 19 years old over the past seventeen years.

As we can see from the above table teen pregnancy is gradually decreasing. If we want to see that number continue to decrease then we need to get an educational program that works which is comprehensive sex education. Studies have shown that when this type of education was taught many years ago the teen pregnancy rate was not this high. “More than 140 national organizations acknowledge that comprehensive sex education can effectively address adolescents’ sexual health needs. Their support is based upon numerous findings that comprehensive sex education effectively promotes abstinence and may delay sexual debut, reduce sexual frequency, reduce the number of sexual partners, reduce STI risk, and increase the likelihood of consistent contraceptive use. Comprehensive sex education may be especially beneficial for sexually active youth and those with same-sex partners.” Lets go Richmond, lets be one of the firsts to start a program that works and lets watch the teen pregnancy rate decrease.

Works Cited

Michael Reece, et al. “Beyond Abstinence-Only: Relationships Between Abstinence Education And Comprehensive Topic Instruction.” Sex Education: Sexuality, Society And Learning 10.2 (2010): 171-185.ERIC. Web. 3 Oct. 2013

Grant, Gale. “Richmond’s Teen Pregnancy Rate is the Lowest in 10 years.” Times dispatch: web. 2012.

 

posted by McKenzie Davis in Uncategorized and having 2 Comments

My View

Teenage pregnancy is when a female between the ages of thirteen and nineteen               become pregnant. Although the teenage pregnancy rate has dropped  since 2010,     there is still a shocking number of teen pregnancies across the United States.              Back in August 2012, NBC News reported that children engaged in sexual activity  between ages ten and thirteen. I blame the fact that children are becoming          becoming pregnant at such a young age on the lack of parenting and the way sex education is taught in schools today. There are two types of sex education.                     The first type is called abstinence-only sex education. Let’s start of with the the       definition of abstinence; abstinence is the practice  of restraining oneself                       from engaging in something of interest, such as sex. So, abstinence-only sex         education is a form of sex education that emphasized abstinence from sex, and             often excludes many other types of sexual and reproductive health education,     particularly on the subject of birth control and condoms. The second type of sex   education is comprehensive sex education. This type of sex education covers all         areas relating to sex, such as relationships, attitudes towards sex, sexual roles,        gender relations, and the pressure children are put under to be engaged in              sexual activity. There has been an ongoing debate on which type of education is          best for the children. When I say best I mean in regards to which type of              education will result in a lower rate of teenage pregnancy. Some people believe abstinence needs to be taught because not a lot of detail is given; it is a very basic       type of education. People also believe that this type of education will “protect” the       child’s mind from all the detail. Now on the other hand, some people believe that             the full blown truth, what they are taught in comprehensive sex education, needs              to be taught because people will be more scared to try sex because they will know      every detail about sex. There are many people who play a role in the child’s life           when it comes to sex education. Some of the people who are involved are parents,           the teachers (not only the sex education teachers,) the government, friends, and             the media. The parents play a role because they are the ones that are truly there             for the child; the child is going to feel most comfortable when talking to the parent.             It is important that the parents are supportive. The teachers are another big           influence when it comes to supporting the child. For the most part, they are the            ones teaching the information so it is important that it is done right. In some cases,        sex education is the first and only time when children here about sex. Lastly, the       friends are another big part when dealing with the pressure of sex. It is important           that the child interacts with a supportive and they bring a positive influence to the      group. More than likely, if your friends are having sex you are going to want to fit              in and engage in the same things. It is important to know all the ins and outs when    dealing with sex education.

Teen pregnancy is a huge problem in the United States. We are talking           about the future of this country; it is said that only one in three teen moms earn                 a high school diploma.  If we want our children to have a successful future it is        important that they are taught the proper way; and that is through comprehensive           sex education. Comprehensive sex education explains that saying no to sex is the        most reliable way to prevent STD’s and unexpected pregnancies. It also goes a             step further by teaching the effectiveness of condoms and birth control. Even           though the main goal of comprehensive sex education is to encourage abstinence, everyone is aware that circumstances will arise and sexual intercourse will                     take place. So, it is important for children to know the resources that are available            to them for they are  put in that situation of temptation. As a future teacher and         parent I do not want to see a child’s life ruined because they did not have the         resource of a condom or birth control. As I stated before, there are cases where         teens will experience temptation, so there are many teens who do not remain         abstinent until marriage. Comprehensive sexual education is starting to find its               way back into schools. “More than 140 national organizations acknowledge that comprehensive sex education can effectively address adolescents’ sexual health       needs. There support is based upon numerous finding that comprehensive sex     education effectively promotes abstinence and may delay sexual debut, reduce         sexual frequency, reduce the number of sexual partners, reduce STD risk, and       increase the likelihood of consistent contraceptive use.” (Reece 173.) Why would      people deny this type of program for their child? Abstinence-only sex education is          still popular throughout most schools but if we want to reduce the rate of teen       pregnancy and want a brighter future for our children then comprehensive sex     education is the only option that will give us these results.

 

Works Cited

Michael Reece, et al. “Beyond Abstinence-Only: Relationships Between Abstinence Education And Comprehensive Topic Instruction.” Sex Education: Sexuality,               Society And Learning 10.2 (2010):    171-185.ERIC. Web. 3 Oct. 2013.

Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F., and David W. Hall. “Abstinence-Only Education And Teen Pregnancy Rates:    Why We Need Comprehensive Sex Education In The U.S.            ” Plos ONE 6.10 (2011): 1-11.     Academic Search Complete. Web. 27 Sept.             2013.

posted by McKenzie Davis in Uncategorized and having 2 Comments

I am going to change my topic a little bit. I am still staying with sex education and how that affects teen pregnancy but I am going to compare the two types of sex education and see which one is better recommended for a lower outcome of teen pregnancy.

There are two types of ways sex can be taught; one is through abstinence-only and the other is comprehensive. These two types of education are complete opposites of each other. Abstinence-only sex education is taught by emphasizing the importance of staying away from sex, and also the use of birth control and condoms are not talked about in abstinence-only education. Where on the other hand, everything relating to sex is taught in comprehensive sex education. Comprehensive takes sex education a step further and talks about relations, attitudes towards sex, sexual roles, gender relations, and the peer pressure to be sexually active.  Safe sex is also taught in sex education; meaning the proper way to use a condom and the usage of birth control.  It is said that people would rather have comprehensive education taught in schools because it is more brutal and truthful, resulting in students wanting to wait longer before engaging in sex.

There is an article that I found that compared four different schools around the country who teach abstinence-only sex education. One of  many reasons that I picked this article is because my hometown is one of the school districts that were interviewed; Powhatan Virginia. The article is titled “Impacts of Abstinence Eduactons on Teen Sexual Activity, Risk of Pregnancy, and Risk of Sexually Transmitted Disease. This article introduces the topic by stating that more schools around the country are starting to teach sex through the abstinence method and that the schools are getting funds to support them and in return they must follow the Title V, Section 510 under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996. This section requires schools to teach that abstinence is the only way to avoid pregnancy and STD’s. The four schools that were interviewed were in the towns of Powhatan, Virginia; Miami, Florida; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Clarksdale, Mississippi. Each school district taught sex education in a different way; Powhatan offered a nine week health/physical education in  eighth grade and topics did not touch on STD’s and abstinence and they have another health class in ninth grade which covered abstinence but did not cover STD’s or “safe sex materials.”  Clarksdale was closely related to Powhatan, they did not have much education on any of these issues. Now on the other hand, Miami taught sex education in grades six through eight on human growth and development, STD’s, abstinence, and drug and alcohol prevention; and Milwaukee had a course for K-12 on abstinence and contraceptive use. There were 2,057 students surveyed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This chart represents: Impacts on unprotected sex and consequences of teen sex, all four programs.

 

Program             Control            Program-Control

Group                        Group                   Difference

(Percentage)   (Percentage)      (Percentage Points)        p value

Unprotected Sex at First Intercourse

Remained abstinent (always)                   49                     49                         0                            0.91

Had sex, used condom first time                  44                               43                         1              0.59

Had sex, no condom first time                    7                                  8                         — 1           0.45

F-test of distributional differences                                                                                             0.40

Unprotected Sex in the Last 12 Months

Abstinent last 12 months                               56                                55                        1             0.76

Had sex, always used condoms                   23                                 23                         —1        0.77

Had sex, sometimes used condoms      17                               17                           0                  0.88

Had sex, never used condoms                    4                                4                                      0     0.84

F-test of distributional differences                                                                                              0.95

Consequences of Teen Sex

Ever been pregnant                                           10                                 10                           1    0.68

Ever had a baby                                           5                          5                         -1                     0.56

Ever had an STD (reported)                  5                        4                        1                        0.53

 

In another article I found, “Beyond abstinence-only: relationships between abstinence education and comprehensive topic instruction,” discusses the differences between abstinence only and comprehensive sex education. The article states that, “Comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) emphasizes abstinence as the most reliable way to avoid STD’s and unintended pregnancies. However, it also teaches the effectiveness of condoms and other contraceptives. Unlike the abstinence programs most comprehensive programs include instruction on communication skills, decision making, sexual orientation, and gender identity.” These are two very different way of teaching and now we need to find out which one has an outcome of lower teen pregnancies. This article also talks about the roles teachers play in teaching sex education, which we will talk about later. This article will help me out more when comparing the two topics. The article I used above is a good one but I need to find one on comprehensive only. For some reason the one search has not been working for me the past two days, but when I get that information I will be sure to post.

 

Works Cited

Justin Wheeler, et al. “Impacts Of Abstinence Education On Teen Sexual Activity, Risk Of Pregnancy, And Risk Of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.” Journal Of Policy Analysis And Management 27.2 (2008): 255-276. ERIC. Web. 3 Oct. 2013.

 

Michael Reece, et al. “Beyond Abstinence-Only: Relationships Between Abstinence Education And Comprehensive Topic Instruction.” Sex Education: Sexuality, Society And Learning 10.2 (2010): 171-185.ERIC. Web. 3 Oct. 2013.

posted by McKenzie Davis in Uncategorized and having 3 Comments

Who is involved?

There are several different stakeholders that are involved with teenage pregnancy, not only teenage pregnancy but how to prevent teenage pregnancy. The people who are involved must be open to have conversation and willing to tell the truth. The stakeholders involved in teenage pregnancy include, the parents, friends, the media, and the schools. I also think that the government plays a small role with this situation as well.

Let’s start off by talking about how the parents play a role. The parents are the ones that are raising the children, so more than likely the children will act on how they were raised. The parent is the overall role model, if a parent is out all the time drinking or doing other things and not home to spend time with the child then more than likely the child is going to end up in trouble. In fact, “daughters of teen moms are 22% more likely to become a teen mom.” This goes to show that the children follow in their parents footsteps. Not only is the parent the overall role model but they are also the ones that need to be there if their children needs to talk about anything, like sex. Simmons from the Washington Times states, “seven out of ten teens are ready to listen to you, their parents, talk about sex.”  The children need their parents there for them to talk to and parents need to let their children know that they are there for them whenever they have questions.  “About 80% of girls and 70% of boys talked with a parent about at least one sex related issue,” said a report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Now onto how the schools play a role in the formation of teenagers minds about sex. The National Center for Health Statistics stated, that on a study of 2,800 teens, 97% of boys and 96% girls said they have received some form of sex education whether it was from a school, church, or a community center, before they were eighteen. Teenagers need some sort of sex education and it is important that it is taught right; this is where the schools play a huge role. The schools are funded by the government to teach some sort of health related class, this being where sex-education is taught. Since the schools are the main ones teaching about this issue it is important that the stress the fact on what sex is and what the consequences can turn out to be: teen pregnancy.

Friends are the ones who have the most influence on others about sex. In the chart below, it shows that 43% of teens are influenced to have sex by their friends. So it is important for the children to pick a good group of friends and not hang around a bad crowd. If a teen feels left out more than likely they are going to hop on the band wagon and if their friends are having sex the more than likely so will they.  This type of group forms a negative role on the foundation of teen pregnancy.

The government plays a role by the means of funding the public schools with what they need in order to have a health class. The government also decides what is available to teens for sex, such as birth control. If the government decides to take that right away to teens then teen pregnancy will become a much bigger issue. To go along with this the media has a small role. The show 16 and pregnant is a good a bad thing, it shows children how much work it is to have a kid but then a child could think, “oh if they can do it then I can do it too.”

There are many people who play a role in forming a child’s life so it is important that we do all we can to make it a positive experience and we give all we can to fulfill their needs.

 

Work Cited

Curran, CarlaWitt, Virginia. “Talking About Sex.” State Legislatures 28.9 (2002): 24. MasterFILE Premier.Web. 19 Sept. 2013

            Wetzstein, Cheryl. “Teens report high exposure to sex education; birth control talks not as widespread.” The Washington Times (2010) Web. (2010)

(THERE IS MORE TO COME)

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History of Teenage Pregnancy

Teenage pregnancy has been an issue for many decades. In fact, between the 1970’s and 1980’s the number of teen pregnancies increased by about five percent. That may not seem like a lot but when adding 50 more pregnancies to the already high number, it truly is a lot. Sex-education has become a topic of discussion on whether it is being taught properly in schools today. Deborah Simmons, a writer for The Washington Times, states that, “instead of children being taught not to have sex, they are being taught how to have sex.” Back in the 1970’s a survey was conducted in Maryland; the teacher had her class of ten and eleven year olds write any question they had about sex. She found that the students asked about condoms, birth control, and street names that they had heard of. This all took place before AIDS had made a huge breakthrough. So this goes to show that teen pregnancy and the thought of sex has been around for a long time it is the sexually transmitted diseases like AIDS that has become another part of the issue.

It is still being discussed today what really should be taught in schools on the subject of sex. It is easy to say that sex education needs to be taught in schools but what should actually be taught is what is difficult. A survey was done back in 2010 by The Washington Times about the difference between what girls knew and what guys knew about sex. The most common topic was sexually transmitted diseases, 93% of girls and 92% of boys remember this being taught in schools. The second most common topic was how to prevent HIV/AIDS, 89% of boys and 88% of girls said they were taught about this. The third most common topic was, “how to said ‘no’ to sex, with 87% of girls and 81% boys remember receiving some sort of education on this issue. This issue was mostly taught to kids of elementary and middle school ages.

The picture that is included goes to show that teen pregnancy really has been around for a long time. As you can see the numbers are slowly declining but we are just a little under the number of what it was in 1940, which is not good. As we keep exploring how sex-education is taught in schools we will hopefully be able to tell whether or not the methods being used today are working.  

Works Cited

 Curran, CarlaWitt, Virginia. “Talking About Sex.” State Legislatures 28.9 (2002): 24. MasterFILE Premier.Web. 19 Sept. 2013

 

            Wetzstein, Cheryl. “Teens report high exposure to sex education; birth control talks not as widespread.” The Washington Times (2010) Web. (2010)

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Teen Pregnancy Blog 1

Although the teenage pregnancy rate has dropped since 2010, there is still a shocking number of teenage pregnancies in the state of Virginia. NBC news reported back in August 2012 that sexual activity started in children between the ages of ten and thirteen. I blame this on the parents and how children are being taught in schools today.  School systems are teaching sex education through abstinence-only education. Abstinence is the practice of restraining oneself from indulging in something of interest, like sex.  With that being said, the schools are teaching kids that if they are sexually active then they need to be using protection, such as a condom.  Teenagers think that if they use a condom then they will not get pregnant, so what they fail to understand is that they are not fully protected by using a condom.  Also in the teenage stage of life is when they like to experiment with things, so of course they are going to try the sex thing out. Along with that, if everyone else is doing it then they are going to jump on the bandwagon and do it as well so they do not feel left out.  Not only is sex education being taught in high school it is now being taught in middle school. Middle school age is way to young to be learning about sex because like I said they are going to want to start experimenting and we do not need eleven or twelve year olds walking around pregnant. It is said that three out of ten girls will become pregnant before they are twenty. It may not seem like a lot but we have to remember that children start becoming pregnant around fourteen, they have no business becoming a parent, they are still developing themselves. It all becomes a ripple effect. Later we will go more into detail on the parents roles and how the schools should take action.

The stakeholders that would coincide with teenage pregnancy would be the schools themselves, the parents of the teenagers, and the government. The schools are overall going to teach the subject of sex so it is important that it is done in the correct manner or the childs future could be at stake. The parents also play a role as a stakeholder because they are the main ones who should be there teaching them right from wrong. They are also the ones that need to be there incase there children have any questions about sex. The government is another stakeholder and plays an important role. The government are the ones that set the laws for education and teenage pregnancies, which we will discuss later. There are a lot of people involved with this issue and they are the ones that have part of the child’s future in their hands and needs to lead them in the right direction.

Works Cited

Yeon, Yvette. Teen Pregnancy rate down in Richmond. NBC news. 2012. (web)

unknown author. Teen Pregnancy.  Hampton Roads Performs. 2013. (web)

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