Resistors to the Eagle Backpack Program (Blog 8)

The main resistors of the Eagle Backpack Program will be the community members and organizations that will have to provide the funds and donations for the program. The local churches will oppose this solution to the hungry children in the county’s educational system because they already provide funds, donations, and many volunteers to help out other hunger-related organizations in the Farmville community such as FACES and Meals on Wheels.

The United Way of Prince Edward County is a non-profit organization who, “is concerned about the problems faced by those in the community and is committed to help find solutions” (**United Way of Prince Edward County**). The United Way will be supportive of the solution, but they will also resist it because they are a big organization working with a lot of communities, and they will want their money to be used for solutions that they know will make an impact. They may also be resistant to the program because they may have to work with the program on finding or providing a space that can serve as the program headquarters and help with finding a distribution place within the schools.

The Prince Edward County School Board, the school system, and the food service department could all be considered resistors of the Eagle Backpack Program. They may be resistant to the program at first if they initially believe that they will have to fund the program but then this will go away once they become aware that this is not the case. They will be resistant to this solution because they will be worried about the confidentiality of the students who are participating in the program, not wanting them to be singled out among their peers. They may also be resistant to the program because they will have to work with the program coordinators to provide an area where the backpacks can be distributed.

The last main resistor of the Eagle Backpack Program solution would be the members of the Farmville community who will have to help support, fund, and donate in order to keep the program running. These community members, including parents of Prince Edward County students, may resist the program because they are already providing a lot of money, donations, and support to the school and other organizations in the county. They may also resist the solution due to the amount of volunteers and volunteer hours it will require to collect the food, unpack and sort the food at the headquarters, packing the many backpacks for distribution, and finally distributing the backpacks on the day the students receive them. These volunteer hours will require many community members take time away from work, their weekends, and even their own families to help out the Eagle Backpack Program.

Without the Eagle Backpack Program, the children in the Prince Edward County Schools will continue to go hungry on the weekends and during short-term breaks from school. The children will continue to be denied their full educational experience because they are being directly affected by hunger, causing them to loose attention and not focus on learning. As a child continues down this path, it will become harder and harder to pull them out of the downward spiral because they have missed so much information and quality education from not being able to focus. Virginia is very big on standardized testing, the Standards of Learning (or SOLs), and holding schools, counties, and districts accountable for the test scores. With the effects that hunger has on students, Prince Edward County will see a decline in these test scores, resulting in repercussions from the state.

Works Cited

“United Way of Prince Edward County.” United Way, n.d. Web. 5 Nov 2013. <http://uwprinceedward.org/About_Us.php>.

The Eagle Backpack Program (Blog 7)

Too often, the only meals that a child will receive during an entire week’s time are the ones that are provided at school. Hunger is an evident societal problem that can be seen throughout Farmville and Prince Edward County. More specifically, this complex problem is having major negative effects on the child population of Farmville and Prince Edward County, especially their education. Within Farmville, the number of students receiving free meals is about four times higher than the number receiving only reduced0rate meals. It is unclear what exactly this relationship means, but seems to perhaps indicate that some kind of need is not being met by the federal SNAP program or that there is a far greater need within Farmville.

There are many issues that hunger causes that affect a child’s health and education. A big side effect that hunger has on children is their education and ability to learn. The chronic stress it puts on the children negatively affects their memory and concentration, which increases the achievement gap between the low-income African American and Hispanic children, and the Caucasian children. According to the American Psychological Association, “inadequate education contributes to the cycle of poverty by making it more difficult for low-income children to lift themselves and future generations out of poverty” (“Effects”).

A student will be denied his or her complete educational experience if they are having to sit through class on an empty stomach because their complete attention and focus is not on learning. Children who do not eat breakfast either zone out during class, fall asleep, or become lethargic. Some other characteristics of hungry students include not being able to under assignments; losing materials needed for school that are given out by the teacher; not wanting to participate in class; they do not progress academically on time; or they can become depressed.

This is an example backpack filled with food for a student from a school system who already participates in a program similar to the one being suggested in this post.

The Eagle Backpack Program needs to be adopted to help the students of Prince Edward County who suffer from food insecurity, not knowing when or where their next meal will come. The backpacks will include two breakfasts, two lunches, two dinners, and two snacks that are nonperishable, child-friendly, nutritious, and easy to prepare. They are distributed on Fridays to the participating children.  The program will be funded through local churches, donations, and The United Way of Prince Edward County. Meaning, the food service department, the school system, nor the school board will be held accountable for funding this program.

The Eagle Backpack Program is an essential for the weekends but also needs to be implemented for school breaks, such as Thanksgiving. The only break that is not included is during the summer break because Prince Edward County offers a program called Feed the Hungry Program, where children ages zero to eighteen can come to the elementary school for free meals. The need for this program is big because according to the Virginia Department of Education Free and Reduced Priced Eligibility Report, Prince Edward County has 2,442 students enrolled in School Nutrition Programs. Of those students, 66.31%, or 1,606 students, accept free or reduced lunches, with 9.54% qualified for reduced lunched and 56.77% qualified for free lunches.

Works Cited

“Effects of Poverty, Hunger, and Homelessness of Children and Youth.” American Psychological Association. American Psychological Association, n.d. Web. 25 Oct 2013. <http://www.apa.org/pi/families/poverty.aspx?item=2>.

“Free and Reduced Priced Eligibility Report-Division Level.” 2012-2013 National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Virginia Department of Education, 15 Feb 2013. Web. Oct 28 2013. <http://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/nutrition/statistics/free_reduced_eligibility/2012-2013/divisions/frpe_div_report_sy2012-13.pdf>.

But What About Our Children? (Blog 6)

Team No Kid Hungry

Too many children are forced to deal with hunger!

Hunger and poverty is an evident societal problem that can be seen throughout Farmville and Prince Edward County. More specifically, this complex problem is having major negative effects on the child population of Farmville and Prince Edward County, especially their education. For a large portion of the students within the Farmville/Prince Edward County school system, the school-based nutrition programs are the only form of nutrition assistance they receive. Within Farmville, the number of students receiving free meals is about four times higher than the number receiving only reduced-rate meals. It is unclear what exactly this relationship means, but seems to perhaps indicate that some kind of need is not being met by the federal SNAP program or that there is a far greater need within Farmville.

There are many issues that hunger causes that affect a child’s health and education. Children are considered to be the most obvious victims because “children who are poorly nourished suffer up to 160 days of illness each year” (“2013”). This just comes to show that children are the easiest targets in the eyes of hunger. Another big side effect that hunger has on children is their education and ability to learn. The chronic stress it puts on the children negatively affects their memory and concentration, which increases the achievement gap between the low-income African American and Hispanic children, and the Caucasian children. According to the American Psychological Association, “inadequate education contributes to the cycle of poverty by making it more difficult for low-income children to lift themselves and future generations out of poverty” (“Effects”).

A student will be denied his or her complete educational experience if they are having to sit through class on an empty stomach because their complete attention and focus is not on learning. Children who do not eat breakfast either zone out during class, fall asleep, or become lethargic. Some other characteristics of hungry students include not being able to understand assignments; losing materials needed for school that are given out by the teacher; not wanting to participate in class; they do not progress academically on time; or they can become depressed.

This is a collage I put together with some visualizations of different effects hunger can have on a child’s education. The pictures represent failing assignments, a frustrated student, a sleeping student, and lastly, a student who is zoned-out in class.

Too often, the only meals that a child will receive during an entire week’s time are the ones that are provided at school. In Prince Edward County, Virginia, there are 2,442 students are enrolled in School Nutrition Programs. Of those students, 66.31%, or 1,606 students, accept free or reduced lunches, with 9.54% qualified for reduced lunches and 56.77% qualified for free lunches (“Free”). This percentage of students calculates to two-thirds of the student body being eligible for some sort of food assistance. For the 2010-2011 school year, Prince Edward County Elementary School had not only the most School Nutrition Program members, at 1,062, but also the most eligible members for free or reduced meals at 724, when compared to the rest of Virginia (Grimes).

In Farmville, of the approximate 1,244 children living in households qualified to accept federal help, only 48.47% of them live in a residence that engages in other federal programs such as Food Stamps or SNAP (Bishaw). Given that there are an estimated 1,244 individuals under 18 years of age determined to be living in poverty and assuming a poverty distribution similar to the general population, it can be estimated that there are 646 children living below 185% of the poverty level and 519 children living below 130% of the poverty level. This would suggest that in Farmville, There are an estimated 519 students receiving free meals and 127 additional students receiving reduced-rate meals (Bishaw).

Works Cited

“2013 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics.” World Hunger Education Service, n.d. Web. 25 Oct 2013. <http://worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm>.

Bishaw, A. 2012. “Poverty: 2010 and 2011.” American Community Survey Briefs: U.S. Census Bureau, p.1-8.

“Effects of Poverty, Hunger, and Homelessness of Children and Youth.” American Psychological Association. American Psychological Association, n.d. Web. 25 Oct 2013. <http://www.apa.org/pi/families/poverty.aspx?item=2>.

“Free and Reduced Priced Eligibility Report-Division Level.” 2012-2013 National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Virginia Department of Education, 15 Feb 2013. Web. Oct 28 2013. <http://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/nutrition/statistics/free_reduced_eligibility/2012-2013/divisions/frpe_div_report_sy2012-13.pdf>.

Grimes, Catherine Digilio. Department of Education. Department of Education, 2010. Web. 27 Oct 2013. <http://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/nutrition/regulations/director_memos/2010-2011/04.pdf>.

What Should Be Done With Farmville Hunger? (Blog 5)

Hunger is nothing new to neither America nor Virginia. A hungry person does not just have to be characterized as a homeless, famished person living in a cardboard box, they could be a person who has a job and a home but do not make enough each paycheck and they are constantly worrying whether they should use their money to pay for a meal or use it to get their much needed medication. A small town in Virginia that most Longwood University students will call “home” for about four years, is only 7 square miles and houses 8,216 residents. This town is called Farmville and is home to an organization names Farmville Area Community Emergency Services, or FACES, which is ranked third in all of Central Virginia in the amount of food they distribute to residents that cannot afford groceries to feed themselves or their families. Without this non-profit organization, Farmville would have a lot of starving residents because they serve about 482 families per week. Even though FACES dispenses roughly 12,700 pounds of food per week, the organization is always in constant need for more because they can never have enough.

If the United States is the wealthiest country in the world, why is hunger such a big problem? There is no scarcity in the amount of food available, we have plenty of highways and trucks to move this food daily, and the shelves in the grocery stores have plenty of stock, but none of this matters if a person does not have the money in their wallet or bank account to buy this food. Hunger became a big issue in America around the 1960s and FACES has been in operation since 1981. This can be caused by disruptions in the food supply from severe weather, war, or even plagues. National nutrition programs such as the National School Lunch Program; the Food Stamp Program; the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Woman, Infants, and Children (WIC); and many others have been in place for many decades but still seem to have little impact on controlling this issue.

One of the main stakeholders in the issue of hunger is a child. Children can be affected by hunger as early as in the womb if the mother does not get proper nutrition, causing the baby to suffer from several health problems starting from birth. It can also negatively impact a child’s education and ability to learn. Adults are also affected by hunger, forcing them to choose between paying for food or their other basic needs such as medical bills, utilities, and rent or mortgage. A lot of adults will also choose to go hungry just so their children or other family members will not have to go hungry. Many national and local organizations such as Feeding America, No Kid Hungry, FACES, and Meals On Wheels, are affected by hunger because their main goal is to fight the problem and as the rates increase these organizations are having to do more with fewer resources. Lastly, the national government is a big stakeholder as well. As we have seen during this past week, the government will shut down if no decision can be made on how much money is spent, causing some of the national nutrition programs to be shut down as well, such as WIC. The national government spends roughly $167.5 billion on the hunger and the nutrition programs it has in place. This may only be a small fraction of the federal spending budget for America, but if the amount of people that need assistance keeps increasing then this number will as well and possibly result in another government shutdown.

Some U.S. citizens argue to cut federal spending towards hunger and the nutrition programs so that money can be used towards other areas of national government spending. This has already become evident with the many bills and laws passed that significantly reduce the amount these programs receive but none have been successful in cutting all federal government spending. Other citizens argue that federal funding towards hunger and nutrition programs needs to be increased because cutting the money will just create larger problems. The citizens fighting for more or equal amount of funding will benefit from this proposal.

My Position

Decreasing or completely cutting federal spending on the national nutrition programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Woman, Infants, and Children (WIC), the National School Lunch Program, and the Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), will only create an even bigger problem the United States of America has with hungry and starving citizens. By cutting the government funding, they will not just be stopping the money sent all over America to help citizens in need of food, they will also be ending the lives of many citizens since food is one of main essentials needed to live. Cutting federal spending may help our economy and provide the national government with more money to use elsewhere, but without food, America will have a dramatic increase in death rate from the current 8.39 deaths per 1,000 population, which compared to the world is 88th (CIA, “The World Factbook”). The whole situation will become a downward spiral because malnutrition will cause the human body to slowly shut down and not perform correctly, which will lead to citizens not being capable to holding a job, in turn causing the unemployment rate in America to skyrocket from the current 8.1%, which is ranked 95th compared to the world (CIA, “The World Factbook”). This downward spiral will only cause even more harm to the U.S. economy and government, and that spiral will be a difficult one to turnaround just like the spiral we are trying to reverse with the economy. Some may not see America as having a problem with hunger because it does not have the same “swollen bellies and wide, pleading eyes” that we associate with hunger (“Revealing Hidden Hunger” p.10). Klein et al. hypothesize, “perhaps this misconception is why food insecurity, define as the lack of access to enough food to fully meet basic nutritional needs at all times because of lack of resources, can so easily and often go unrecognized in the United States” (10). By fully eliminated or even just decreasing the federal funds to nutritional programs and hunger organizations, Farmville, VA will be significantly impacted. The residents of Farmville will have to depend on the very few churches, businesses, and clubs in the area for food support if funding is cut because FACES and Meals On Wheels would not be able to stay open. As it is, FACES distributes “over 600 10-lb. bags of food each Saturday” or about “three tons of food a week” and is still in need of a lot more food (Shear, 2012). The cause behind all of this is poverty, and Farmville’s poverty level, 34.6%, is over triple the level for Virginia, 10.7% (“Farmville”). In order to help the poverty level in Farmville and even the United States, more jobs need to become available and those seeking assistance from the government or organizations such as FACES should not be permitted to solely rely on the services.

Works Cited

“CIA – The World Factbook.” The World Factbook — North America: United States. N.p., n.d. Web. 1, Oct. 2013.

<https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html>.

“Farmville (town), Virginia QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau.” Farmville QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau. N.p., n.d. Web. 4, Oct. 2013. <http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/51/5127440.htm>.

Klein, Melissa D., et al. “Revealing Hidden Hunger How To Screen And Intervene.” Contemporary Pediatrics 30.2 (2013): 10-20.

Shear, Bill. “FACES Seeks Continued Contributions.” The Farmville Herald. 11, Dec. 2012. Web. 3, Oct. 2013.

<http://farmvilleherald.com/main.asp?Search=1&ArticleID=8180&SectionID=9&SubSectionID=62&S=1>.

Just Tell Me What’s Wrong Already! (Blog 4)

Poverty is the problem that lies beneath hunger in Farmville. Hunger is directly linked to poverty. When a person looses their job because of the economy or other reasons, they stop having a constant source of monthly income. With no monthly income, there is no way for them to purchase food causing them to become sick and weak from malnourishment, eliminating their chances for another job. The poverty level in Prince Edward County, where Farmville is located, is among the highest in Virginia with 25% (“Kids Count Data Center”). Meanwhile, the unemployment rate in Prince Edward County has shot up from 4.5% in 2007 to 9.2% in 2011 (“Kids Count Data Center”). Considering the only major employers in Farmville include Longwood University, Green Front Furniture, Centra Southside Community Hospital, and Wal-Mart, jobs in this small town are hard to come by. Yes, there may be a lot of smaller business in Farmville, but they either not dependable on whether they will stay open or not, or it is hard to move up in that company to make enough money to live off of.

As of 2011, Prince Edward County had a total of 3,992 children and 1,069 of those children were living in poverty (“Kids Count Data Center”). This proves that obviously poverty affects children directly just because their parents or family do not have enough money to live. As an Elementary Education major, I see this all the time but it never fails to break my heart. Prince Edward also has among of the highest percentages of students approved for free or reduced price school lunch, with 69.5% (“Kids Count Data Center”). Since this approval depends on income, it becomes evident that 69.5% of students live in a home that cannot afford a $2.00 lunch for their children. Unfortunately, this means that a lot of these families cannot afford food at all causing the lunch from school one of the only meals a day they receive.

**This is not yet completed due to inaccessible Government sources!**

Works Cited

 “Virginia Indicators.” Kids Count Data Center. The Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2013. Web. 2 Oct 2013. <http://datacenter.aecf.org/data#VA/5/2/3,5>.

Who Even Cares? (Blog 3)

Some of the many impacts hunger has on a family is evident in this photo.

Hunger is a serious issue all over the world, and unfortunately we see it here in Farmville as well. The Farmville Area Community Emergency Services, or FACES, as well as Meals On Wheels are working on a daily basis to help the members of our community who have to suffer from hunger.

If you are under the assumption that hunger does not affect you, then you might want to rethink that. According to a 2010 study done by Brandeis University, $167.5 billion per year is what hunger costs America. These billions of dollars are caused by the “direct and indirect costs of hunger-related charities, illness and psychosocial dysfunction and the impact of less education/lower productivity”. They even calculated it out to show this means every citizen is paying $542 each year for hunger (Brandeis University, 2011). Since this study is almost three years old, these numbers have most likely increased during that period.

Hunger Facts

A lot of students in America get their only meal of the day at school and according to this image, 62% of our teachers witness this problem firsthand. This image came from nokidhungry.org, who goal is to eliminate childhood hunger in America.

A HUGE stakeholder in this issue is children. They are considered to be the most obvious victims because “children who are poorly nourished suffer up to 160 days of illness each year” (“2013 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics”). The website also states that children are affected by hunger while they are still womb causing “low birth weight, neonatal deaths, learning disabilities, mental retardation, poor health, blindness, and premature death” (2013 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics”). This just comes to show that children are the easiest target in the eyes of hunger. Another big side effect of hunger on children is their education and ability to learn. The chronic stress it puts on the children negatively affects their memory and concentration, which increases the achievement gap between the low-income African American and Hispanic children and the Caucasian children. According to the American Psychological Association, “inadequate education contributes to the cycle of poverty by making it more difficult for low-income children to lift themselves and future generations out of poverty” (“Effects of Poverty, Hunger, and Homelessness of Children and Youth”).

A third stakeholder of hunger is the adults suffering from hunger. Hunger affects adults by forcing them to choose between paying for food or their other basic needs such as medical bills, utilities, and rent or mortgage. The Brandeis University study found, “in 2010 nearly half of the households seeking emergency food assistance reported having to choose between paying for utilities or heating fuel and food. Nearly 40 percent said they had to choose between paying for rent or a mortgage and food. More than a third reported having to choose between their medical bills and food” (Brandeis University, 2011).

Longwood University itself is a stakeholder to hunger! The university is located in a poverty-stricken area, causing us students to see and feel the impacts that hunger has. As a school, some organizations and clubs are constantly working to raise money and collect food for donations to the organizations such as FACES or Meals On Wheels that serve our community. We also have a lot of students that volunteer their time with these organizations trying to make an impact. Hunger may have indirect impacts on our school but they are still there.

Critical Summary

ScienceDaily describes their page as “your source for the latest research news”. They provide articles that use dependable research from universities, journals, and other research organizations. I did a little bit of research on the website before deciding to use it as a source to see if it was a good source. It has been granted many “Top” awards and has gotten positive reviews from several other newspapers and magazines. This article used research from Brandeis University, which is a private research university with a liberal arts focus in Waltham/Boston, Massachusetts. The only problem with this article is the date, it was written two years ago but the research used is three years old now. Within the article, the research statistics and data is compared to similar research done by the same university but from 2007, showing the dramatic increases. Based off of this information, I’m sure that there will be another drastic change in the data and statistics if more research was done now.

Works Cited (MLA)

Brandeis University. “Social and economic cost of hunger and food insecurity in US in 2010 was $167.5 billion.” ScienceDaily, 5 Oct. 2011. Web. 25 Sep. 2013. <http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111005131705.htm>.

“Effects of poverty, hunger and homelessness of children and youth.” American Psychological Association. American Psychological Association, n.d. Web. 25 Sep 2013. <www.apa.org/pi/families/poverty.aspx?item=2>.

“2013 world hunger and poverty facts and statistics.” World Hunger Education Service. n.d. Web 25 Sep 2013. <http://www.worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm>.

How Long is Too Long? (Blog 2)

Hunger is not an issue most college students take time to ponder on because many of us are privileged enough to not have to worry about how we will come up with enough means to pay for our next meal. Farmville, Virginia may be a small town of only 8,216 residents, but the Farmville Meals on Wheels delivers 50 hot meals per day and the Farmville Area Community Emergency Services (FACES) serves on average 482 families per week. Hunger is not just characterized as the homeless, famished residents of Farmville, it is also the residents who are constantly worrying whether they should use their money to pay for a meal or their much needed medication. For me, this is where it really hits home. My grandpa has been diabetic his whole life and for me to even consider him having to debate whether he is going to eat a meal or buy his insulin is a dangerous situation!

Famine in Farmville is nothing new, neither to Virginia nor the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Measurement of Food Insecurity and Hunger, “hunger became a truly public issue in the United States in the late 1960s, even though a number of major federal assistance programs were already in place” (p. 23). FACES in Farmville has been an organization since 1981, so if the United States is the wealthiest country in the world, why is hunger such a big problem? There is no scarcity in the amount of food available, we have plenty of highways and trucks to move this food daily, and the shelves in the grocery stores have plenty of stock, but what is the problem then you ask? Well simply put, “none of this matters if customers have no money in their pockets. Poverty spoils every meal” (“Cause of Hunger,” n.d.). National nutrition programs that were put in effect as an attempt to fight this issue include: the National School Lunch Program, the Food Stamp Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Woman, Infants, and Children (WIC), and many others. (“Food Assistance Programs,” n.d.).

A few Longwood University students and organizations have expressed concerns about the issue going on this town we call our home for a temporary time and some have even held fundraisers for FACES and Meals On Wheels. A 2011 article in the Farmville Herald, Hoke Currie, Director of Operations for SCOPE/Meals On Wheels, asserts, “it takes community support to operate a Meals On Wheels program, and Longwood students are a key component in that support” (Currie, 2011). This article that was written to specifically thank Longwood students says a lot about the students who are trying to take action to improve their temporary homes. Along with Federal, State, and Local programs and organizations that have been in effect to help improve the condition of hunger in Farmville, many Farmville clubs and businesses hold fundraisers and donate money or food as much as possible. One example is the Farmville Rotary Club hosting their annual event entitled The Taste of Farmville that was very successful as reinforced by Jeff Smith stating, “this year we made over $7,000” (Swayne, 2013). As you can see, the many contributions to FACES and Meals On Wheels contains a tremendous amount of money and/or food donations, but this obviously is not enough to even help put a damper on the hunger issue in Farmville.

Although FACES is a non-profit organization, they continue to fight the issue of hunger in the Farmville area. This was reassured to me by a chill-provoking quote I read about the organization that went something like this: “That’s why FACES turns the other cheek. FACES looks to the right, sees hungry people and feeds them. FACES turns the other cheek, now looking to the left, sees hungry people and feeds them. Wherever FACES turns it sees hungry people in Prince Edward and FACES feeds them” (Woodley, 2010). If only we could get more residents, students, and business to have the determination that FACES shows, the issue of hunger could possibly be put to a close after many decades of this re-occurrence.

Critical Summary

A journal written by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Measurement of Food Insecurity and Hunger titled “Food Insecurity and Hunger in the United States: An Assessment of the Measure” was published by The National Academies Press out of Washington, D.C. in 2006. The Department’s main goal in writing this journal was to dig deeper into reasons why the United States was having a big problem with hunger, date the issue back to roughly when and how it started and specific assistance programs that can/have been useful to help fight the issue of hunger.

 

References (APA Style)

(2006). Food insecurity and hunger in the united states: An assessment of the measure. The National Academies Press, R1-30. Retrieved from http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11578&page=R1

Bread for the World. (n.d.). Cause of hunger in the u.s. Retrieved from http://www.bread.org/hunger/us/causes.html

Currie, H. (2011, April 12). Lu’s students are important volunteers. The Farmville Herald, Retrieved from http://farmvilleherald.com/main.asp?Search=1&ArticleID=3446&SectionID=9&SubSectionID=62&S=1

National Agricultural Library Food and Nutrition Information Center. (n.d.). Food assistance programs. Retrieved from http://www.nutrition.gov/food-assistance-programs

Swayne, M. (2013, February 14). The taste of farmville – A win-win for all. The Farmville Herald, Retrieved from http://farmvilleherald.com/main.asp?Search=1&ArticleID=8754&SectionID=4&SubSectionID=30&S=1

Woodley, J. (2010, November 18). FACES turns the other cheek. The Farmville Herald, Retrieved from  http://farmvilleherald.com/main.asp?search=1&articleid=2359§ionid=9&subsectionid=37&s=1

Famine in Farmville (Blog 1)

Most students at Longwood University do not realize that hunger is an apparent issue in Farmville, the town we call “home” for most of the year. I know I did not realize the severity of this issue until I volunteered at the Farmville Area Community Emergency Services (FACES).  I am sure a majority of students here did not know that based on the amount of food distributed, FACES is ranked third in Central Virginia (“FACES”). According to their annual report, FACES distributed 658,950 pounds of food between January 1 and December 31. This comes to about 12,700 pounds of food per week, a total of 28,650 bags of food distributed, and an average of 482 families were served per week (“FACES”). This may seem like a lot of food to the average person, but when I was volunteering there the warehouse was packed full with a variety of food and the normal workers were telling me that this is still not enough food. This should be a reality check considering there are only 8,216 residents in Farmville according to the 2010 census (“Farmville).

Most students here at Longwood have never really had to experience what hunger is like while residing in Farmville. Some may say they have experienced this, but their experience includes running out of Bonus Dollars to spend or having no more D-Hall swipes for the week. The kind of hunger I am referring to is the residents of Farmville depending on FACES or Meals on Wheels to provide them with their food for the week or the 69.51% of students in Prince Edward County Public Schools that look forward to their one meal a day at school because it is either free or reduced (“Free”). According to the 2010 census, the percentage of residents that are below the poverty level in Farmville is 34.6%. That is over triple the percentage for Virginia, which is 10.7% (“Farmville”).

To most college students here in the Farmville area, hunger is not an important issue to us because we are not directly impacted. But while attending Longwood University, most students will call Farmville, Virginia their home for about four years getting involved in the tight-knit community here. What most students do not realize is that a lot of the Longwood faculty and staff are directly impacted by poverty and hunger. Whether it is a D-Hall worker that relies on SNAP benefits in order to afford food from Wal-Mart, or it is one of our professors whose mother or father has to depend on FACES at least once a month so they do not go hungry. Having volunteered at FACES many times, I have seen a lot of familiar faces standing in line for food just to make sure their children have food. Meanwhile, these familiar faces I saw are typically some of the nicest faculty and staff you will find at Longwood University. As productive citizen leaders, it is important to educate ourselves on this issue and think about ways we can help those who are less fortunate than us.

 

This is a short video by Amy Harris, a student at Longwood University, that shows a few pictures with captions of the Farmville area and how Hunger has effected it. These photos were taken and this video was put together by Amy.

Critical Summary 

The US Census QuickFacts about Farmville, Virginia are definitely useful towards my research on Hunger in Farmville because the data comes from a survey done by the United States Census Bureau and then summarized into a chart. I would consider it a legitimate source to use because it comes from the Government. The only criticism of the Census is there is no information given to the reaser on whether the Census done in 2010 included the students of Longwood University or not.

Works Cited

“FACES.” Farmville Area Community Emergency Services. N.p.. Web. 13 Sep 2013. <http://www.facesfoodpantry.org/index.htm>.

“Farmville (town), Virginia QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau.” Farmville QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2013. <http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/51/5127440.html>.

“Free and Reduced Priced Eligibility Report-Division Level.” 2012-2013 National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Virginia Department of Education, 15 Feb 2013. Web. 14 Sep 2013. <http://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/nutrition/statistics/free_reduced_eligibility/2012-2013/divisions/frpe_div_report_sy2012-13.pdf>.