Post #14: Performance Project Poster – Prewriting

Due by the class on 4/15

Untitled

For this posting:

1) QUOTE: Write down a favorite quote from the rhetorician (or rhetoricians if you were given the option of combining multiple rhetoricians from the same era) that you have selected to impersonate for your Performance Project. (If you are working with rhetoricians like Aspasia whose writings cannot be cited directly, be creative and include a quote about her from others who made a statement about her, etc). We will want to have such a quotation somewhere at the top of your poster to bring your theorist to life (you can later write it on the poster by hand or find other ways to print a typed-up quote in large-size paper, which you can then glue on the poster, etc–those logistics are entirely up to you). You should also be able to orally explain why this is your favorite statement, why it is significant, what it means to you, etc (you don’t have to include the full description in your poster; include only as much as you think is necessary in the poster, avoiding a clunky look). We want to have at least one such quotation; but feel free to decorate different parts of your poster with more of them.

2) KEY TERMS AND IDEAS: Make an outline of the key terms and ideas from your rhetorician that you will want to map out in your poster. Remember that once you determine those concepts, your next step will be to make them understandable to your audience by including enough verbal and visual details about each key term and idea. You will want your viewers to get a good sense of the meaning of each term/idea and how it is useful and applicable to life and the world around us. You will want to show the links and connections between the terms and some verbal and visual examples you will provide alongside those terms. Make it memorable by using appropriate design (lines, color, shape, etc)! You will not be graded specifically on design principles, but your final poster will need to present information neatly, in enough detail, and in an understandable manner.

3) EXAMPLES: Include some writing about the possible verbal and visual details that might go into your poster about each term/idea you have outlined: what verbal and visual details can be helpful to present to your audience in your poster? What verbal/visual examples can be included to illustrate the terms/ideas? It would be great if you can sketch out a tentative design of your current content on a blank piece of paper, take a photo of it, and add your image in your blog posting – it doesn’t have to be the final organization/outline/design yet, though; but be prepared to develop and finish the poster by April 22nd — remember that you will need to update me about your complete poster by the 22nd (see the updated course schedule on Canvas for more guidance on this requirement); you can perhaps add only a few final touches after that.

4) THREE APPLICATIONS: This is an overarching requirement for your poster and your performance at our upcoming event in general—this might overlap with the prompts above, but I would like to still add this prompt here as a reminder that in order to further add value to your poster, you will want to include at least a few specific points about how your theorist’s rhetoric might be useful for your audience. The goal is to help your audience members (me and the others who stop by) understand the importance of studying rhetoric (when they will come up and ask you about “you”/your theorist during the event). Try to think of as many as possible, but at least three rhetorical things/acts that might apply to various important contexts that your audience might find useful–such as, using your theorist’s ideas, how can your audience member persuade a higher-up to grant a certain advantage (e.g., a scholarship or a job) or other things that your audience might find useful/practical regarding their personal, social, professional, or even spiritual (think St. Augustine) affairs. One way to specify the poster content: You can write down three issues or questions that any human being might have about their life and the world around them, and what you theorist might have to say about those questions, which can intrigue your audience member. OR you can also focus on the idea of “one who doesn’t study rhetoric will be a victim of it”–you can tell your audience member about how that would happen if your audience member didn’t know some useful piece of rhetorical knowledge from your theorist. Examples are galore. Work your creative and critical thinking skills!

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Post #13: Modern & Postmodern Rhetoric – Burke

Due by the class on 4/6

burke

Please complete the readings on Burke for the next week (and skim the introductory parts about modern and postmodern rhetoric) and blog about the following to prepare for our discussions:

1) What are the key terms in Burke’s dramatistic pentad? What do the terms describe?

2) After completing the readings, what argument could be made for broadening the conception of rhetoric beyond public speeches or widely circulated written documents?

3) In your opinion, what kinds of rhetorical texts or events would Kenneth Burke’s theory be more likely to help us understand? Give some specific examples–some of these may be based on your real-life personal experiences (those you would feel comfortable to share).

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Post #12: Renaissance vs Enlightenment

Due by the end of the day on 3/16

Complete the readings assigned for next Monday (Intro to Enlightenment and Locke). What are some of the similarities and/or differences you observe between Locke and Bacon? What are some of the characteristics of the Enlightenment rhetoric according to the reading? What are some of the associations you make with your personal experiences or view of rhetoric and/or contemporary rhetorical events (give at least one example)? As usual, enrich your post with some media.

Oer-Weimarer_Musenhof

Painting: Weimarer’s Courtyard of the Muses

 

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Post #11: Applied Rhetoric Paper – Proposal

Due by the end of the day on 2/27

In your upcoming 8-10 page Applied Rhetoric Paper, you will make an argument about how a specific term, idea, or concept from our course readings and discussions this semester can be applied to a contemporary issue.  Post a proposal for a topic in your Post #11.

First, review the assignment sheet on the Applied Rhetoric Paper (posted on Canvas). In a few paragraphs, discuss the possible contemporary issue you will explore–as well as the rhetorical theorist’s perspectives through which you will explore that issue.  You may enrich your post by adding multimedia.

Be creative!  Also feel free to skim the readings scheduled for the class meeting dates after the announcement of this assignment (e.g., if you would be more interested in modern rhetorical theories of Kenneth Burke, etc).  If you are in doubt about readings that haven’t been discussed yet, you might want to stick with what you already know.  But, don’t hesitate to explore possibilities!  Check back with Canvas over the spring break for feedback on your topic selection.

 

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Post #10: Medieval Rhetoric & St. Augustine

Due by the class on 2/16

Create a new post in your blog, responding to the following questions based on the readings due for class discussion on 2/16.

-Which classical rhetorician had the greatest influence on the shape of rhetorical theory and practice in the Middle Ages?

-Why are the Middle Ages considered a period of fragmentation in rhetorical theory?

-According to St. Augustine, what were the two major functions of rhetoric within the Church?

 

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Post #9: Quintilian

Due by the class on 2/11

Create a new post in your blog, responding to the reading on Quintilian (see the course schedule).

-What can we learn about rhetoric from Quintilian?

-Identify a quote or passage that strikes you as interesting. Why is it interesting? What does this passage tell us about Quintilian’s views vis a vis rhetoric?

-Find and post to your blog an artifact that illustrates one or more of the concepts from the reading — this could be an image or a YouTube video, etc.

Make sure to bring a copy of your response (or your talking points based on it) to the class for discussion and activities.

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Post #8: Cicero

Due by the class on 2/9

Create a new post in your blog, responding to the reading on Cicero (see the course schedule). What do you think is Cicero’s most important contribution to rhetoric? Find an artifact that illustrates one ore more of the concepts from the reading — this could be an image or a YouTube video, etc.

Make sure to bring your response (or your talking points based on it) to the class for discussion and activities.

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Post #7: Responding to your peers

Due by the end of the day on 2/4

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Post #6: Aristotle – Part I

Due by the class on 2/2

Complete the reading assigned for 2/2, and respond to this prompt accordingly. Cite the page numbers from the Aristotle’s reading where your responses are based upon. Please number your responses.

1) Based on your reading, how does Aristotle define rhetoric? How is Aristotle’s view of rhetoric different from Plato’s?

2) Aristotle called rhetoric the counterpart of […] (fill in the blank). In what ways are the two arts similar, and how are they different?

3) What are the three kinds (modes) of persuasion according to Aristotle?

4) Write down one other point you have taken from the reading for Monday (other than the ones mentioned in your responses) which was somehow interesting for you. Why did you find this idea interesting?

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Post #5: Gorgias – Part II

Due by the class on 1/30

For this blogging assignment, perform the same activity you performed for the posting that was due last Wednesday, 1/28.  Based on the pages assigned for 1/30 (pp. 108-120), write down 1-3 different points from Plato’s Gorgias that resonate with your own experience as an individual or as a rhetor (someone who uses rhetoric in everyday life) and a rhetorician (someone who studies rhetoric). Explain in at least a paragraph how you would apply any of the notions discussed in this reading to a contemporary issue. Enrich your post by adding a relevant YouTube video or an image that represents any of the concepts in your posting (you may use Creative Commons images from compfight.com or free images from another online source).gorgias-socrates

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