Oct 15 2013

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Fixed Pictures from 10/8/13

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Oct 08 2013

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Discussion 10/8

This week we went back to Lancer Park at Longwood and checked our traps. We found a lot of southern leopard frogs and green frogs. In one of the traps we caught a juvenile musk turtle and we were able to bring him back to the classroom to get a look at him further. After we checked the traps we called it an early day and headed back to lab to identify the juvenile turtle more precisely and to do some lizard and turtle dissections. I’m glad we finally found some herps in the traps. The last couple of times the whole class checked them we didn’t really find much. This area is looking more promising every time we go!

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Oct 08 2013

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Discussion 10/1

I REALLY enjoyed traveling this week for lab. The location was off Five Forks Road, away from any construction and roadways. It was nice to walk around in the wilderness and see species that we haven’t come across yet this semester. There was a stream, swamp, creek, and open forest, PRIME Herp locations. We came across a few marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum), a green snake (Opheodrys aestivus), and cricket frogs (Acris crepitans). I really hope we go back to this location soon. I want to search for more snakes and possibly even turtles next time! I’m sure many more species will be discovered if we travel the creek further down and explored other habitat around that area.

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Sep 27 2013

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Field Notes #3

Sept 24, 2013                                                     Prince Edward Co., VA

 Weather:           Air Temp: 25.6° C

Relative Humidity: 51%         Cloud Cover: 5%

Habitat:     Field: Black Raspberry, Weeping Willow, Sycamore

Observations:

9:35     Arrival

9:36     Dead Shrew on path. 7.8 cm, tail 2.5 cm.

9:42     Acris crepitans Cricket Frog. 2.5 cm.

9:49 Lithobates sphenocephalus Southern Leopard Frog. 6.2 cm. 28g

Habitat:                        Buffalo Creek

Buffalo Creek

Observations:

9:56     Arrival

9:58     Lithobates clamitans Green Frog. Mud bank. 2.8 cm, <1g

9:58     Acris crepitans Cricket Frog. 2.5 cm, 2g.

10:05   Lithobates sphenocephalus Leopard Frog. 6.5 cm, 25g

10:16   Eurycea cirrigera Two-lined Salamander. Under log. 4.8 cm, tail 5 cm, 1g

10:17   Lithobates sphenocephalus Leopard Frog. Under log. 5.5 cm, 18g

10:43   Eurycea cirrigera Two-lined Salamander. Under log. 3.5 cm, tail 5.5 cm, 1g

10:43   Lithobates catesbeianus Bull Frog. 3.9 cm, 5g

11:34   Lithobates catesbeianus Bull Frog. Under rock. 3.1 cm, 1g

12:00   Acris crepitans Cricket Frog. On bank. 1.75 cm

12:01   Acris crepitans Cricket Frog. On bank. 2.3 cm

12:15  Departure

Bullfrog

 

 

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Sep 19 2013

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The spy who loved frogs!

Hi frog-lovers,

I thought that you guys would enjoy reading this article!

http://www.nature.com/polopoly_fs/1.13710!/menu/main/topColumns/topLeftColumn/pdf/501150a.pdf

Dr. Henk

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Sep 09 2013

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Blog Instructions

Each week, we will venture into the field to observe local wildlife, check our traps, roam the wilds of central Virginia in search of herpetofauna, and observe our tadpoles.  Weekly measurements of first and second year tadpoles will be recorded under ‘Frogwatch.’  While things are still fresh in your mind, write your thoughts of the day’s field trip under ‘Opinions.’  Each week, a new student will be responsible for gathering everyone’s field notebook entries and pictures (let’s please take our own and not rely on outside sources) and blogging the weekly field trip as one entry under ‘Field Notes‘.  Be sure to check off any and all category species and visited sites.   We will save ‘Maps‘ for when we set traps.  I will do week 1 to get the ball rolling.

This exercise will hopefully be innovative and fun.  However, anything posted on the internet is public worldwide.  Always remember you are representatives of Longwood University.

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