Successful Sex

There has been an ongoing debate for years about which type of sexual education is most beneficial for teenagers. The two types of education are abstinence-only sex education and comprehensive sex education. Abstinence-only sex education is the type of education that is being taught in schools around the United States.

My concern with abstinence-only education is that it is not teaching kids all that they need to know about sex. Abstinence only education only teaches students to not engage in sexually activity. It teaches nothing about condoms, birth control, or types of sexually transmitted diseases.  The way kids are experimenting with sex these days it is important that students are aware of all aspects relating to sex. That is why comprehensive sex education should be taught in schools today. This type of educaton teaches students about condoms, birth control, and about sexually transmitted diseases.  “More than 140 national organizations acknowledge that comprehensive sex education can effectively address adolescents’ sexual health needs. There support is based upon numerous finding that comprehensive sex education effectively promotes abstinence and may delay sexual debut, reduce sexual frequency, reduce the number of sexual partners, reduce STD risk, and increase the likelihood of consistent contraceptive use.” (Reece 173.)

It is important that our students get the most effective form of education that they can. That is why it is important that changes are made within the schools. The first thing that needs to happen is make sure that everyone has the correct understanding about both of the types of sex education. A presentation needs to be made at a public event that involove the schools such as a school orientation. Once parents, educators, and the school board knows which type of education results in the lowest teen pregnancy rate they will know that comprehensive sex education is the best type of education for the students. Once this is done the school board will need to take action and adopt the comprehensive sex education program. After this, the whole nation will see the teen pregnancy rate decrease. Studies show that comprehensive sex education works to bring down teen pregnancy. Once schools figure that out the whole world will know.

The Eagle Backpack Program (Blog 7)

Too often, the only meals that a child will receive during an entire week’s time are the ones that are provided at school. Hunger is an evident societal problem that can be seen throughout Farmville and Prince Edward County. More specifically, this complex problem is having major negative effects on the child population of Farmville and Prince Edward County, especially their education. Within Farmville, the number of students receiving free meals is about four times higher than the number receiving only reduced0rate meals. It is unclear what exactly this relationship means, but seems to perhaps indicate that some kind of need is not being met by the federal SNAP program or that there is a far greater need within Farmville.

There are many issues that hunger causes that affect a child’s health and education. A big side effect that hunger has on children is their education and ability to learn. The chronic stress it puts on the children negatively affects their memory and concentration, which increases the achievement gap between the low-income African American and Hispanic children, and the Caucasian children. According to the American Psychological Association, “inadequate education contributes to the cycle of poverty by making it more difficult for low-income children to lift themselves and future generations out of poverty” (“Effects”).

A student will be denied his or her complete educational experience if they are having to sit through class on an empty stomach because their complete attention and focus is not on learning. Children who do not eat breakfast either zone out during class, fall asleep, or become lethargic. Some other characteristics of hungry students include not being able to under assignments; losing materials needed for school that are given out by the teacher; not wanting to participate in class; they do not progress academically on time; or they can become depressed.

This is an example backpack filled with food for a student from a school system who already participates in a program similar to the one being suggested in this post.

The Eagle Backpack Program needs to be adopted to help the students of Prince Edward County who suffer from food insecurity, not knowing when or where their next meal will come. The backpacks will include two breakfasts, two lunches, two dinners, and two snacks that are nonperishable, child-friendly, nutritious, and easy to prepare. They are distributed on Fridays to the participating children.  The program will be funded through local churches, donations, and The United Way of Prince Edward County. Meaning, the food service department, the school system, nor the school board will be held accountable for funding this program.

The Eagle Backpack Program is an essential for the weekends but also needs to be implemented for school breaks, such as Thanksgiving. The only break that is not included is during the summer break because Prince Edward County offers a program called Feed the Hungry Program, where children ages zero to eighteen can come to the elementary school for free meals. The need for this program is big because according to the Virginia Department of Education Free and Reduced Priced Eligibility Report, Prince Edward County has 2,442 students enrolled in School Nutrition Programs. Of those students, 66.31%, or 1,606 students, accept free or reduced lunches, with 9.54% qualified for reduced lunched and 56.77% qualified for free lunches.

Works Cited

“Effects of Poverty, Hunger, and Homelessness of Children and Youth.” American Psychological Association. American Psychological Association, n.d. Web. 25 Oct 2013. <http://www.apa.org/pi/families/poverty.aspx?item=2>.

“Free and Reduced Priced Eligibility Report-Division Level.” 2012-2013 National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Virginia Department of Education, 15 Feb 2013. Web. Oct 28 2013. <http://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/nutrition/statistics/free_reduced_eligibility/2012-2013/divisions/frpe_div_report_sy2012-13.pdf>.

Inexpensive Solution (#7)

The old cliché, “the customer is always right” can be a serious headache for those who work in the customer service industry. In food service, employees are taught to put the customer first and to work to meet their needs. Regardless of the situation, employees must cater to the needs of the customer, even if it is slightly inconvenient. Shouldn’t the Farmville Area Bus use the same ideology? Students pay for the service, and it should be exactly what students need, just as the customer at Chickfila should receive the exact order they paid for.

The Farmville Area Bus’ campus line is not adequately meeting the needs of its customers. The campus line to Longwood Village is often late, overcrowded, and has a schedule that is incompatible with Longwood’s class schedule.

There are two possible solutions:

  1. Return the campus line bus to the schedule it had before the fall of 2013.
  2. Create a separate campus line that goes directly to and from Longwood Village.

Of course, both of these solutions have inherent problems. If the first solution were enacted, it would not cost the university any additional funds, which is a plus. In doing this, the FAB would arrive to Longwood Village and Lancer Park every half-hour to pick up and drop off students which would solve the issues with the bus schedule. However, this solution would not solve the overcrowding and would likely result in the FAB being late more often because of the additional traffic and bus stops at Lancer Park take more time than in previous years. This is the reason that FAB management and Longwood University changed the schedule in the first place.

The creation of a separate campus line also has baggage. This solution would solve all three of student’s complaints: late, overcrowding, and fixing the random schedule. However, this solution would have financial ramifications for the university.

In order to make this solution a reality, Longwood University will need to allocate its already existing funds to the FAB. Students have continually made $2,500 contributions each semester to the university for services such as the FAB. In the 2013-2014 school year, Longwood estimated having $1,685,325 for services such as the FAB intercollegiate athletics, recreation and intramural programs, the student union, student health and wellness services, and debt service in the budget.[i] To make the new campus line a reality, the university would have to spend $56,000 for a new bus and $167, 400 a year for maintenance.[ii] While this sounds like a lot of money, the cost will still leave the university with approximately $1,517, 925 for the remaining services.

The university may not even have to spend $56,000 on a brand new bus. Currently, the university employs four campus buses, one shared and three direct buses to Lancer Park. The Park could keep their three direct buses (and extend the hours from 1:45 to midnight on one or two buses) and the shared campus line could be reallocated to be the Longwood Village’s bus.

The Budget Office would need to become involved at this point to see how the university can reallocate its finances for maintenance. The athletics department seemingly uses the most of the expenditure budget of $1,685,325. A closer look into how this money is being spent would need to be done and some of its current funds to be reallocated to the new campus line. For example, in 2012, Longwood University purchased a new Setra coach bus for its athletics department. This bus contains five 19-inch video monitors, a refrigerator and WiFi. It was even described by a Longwood student as “a hotel on wheels” in the article about its unveiling.[iii] I could not access the cost of new coach buses, but pre-owned coach buses can cost upwards of $400,000, not including its maintenance.[iv] If the athletics department (that affects a small amount of students) can have a “hotel on wheels” with the mutual funds, why can’t the 252 Village residents have a bus that can get them to class efficiently?

(Courtesy of Longwood University; this is an image of the university’s new coach bus. A pre-owned coach bus costs upwards of $400,000 but Longwood’s bus was new and personalized so the price was likely much higher.  This proves that the creation of the campus line to Longwood Village is within reach).

There is certainly room in the budget to get the annual $167,400 for a new campus line to Longwood Village. The necessity of this solution cannot be overstated. Longwood’s plans to eliminate parking will make Village residents particularly reliant on public transportation. Students are paying so much money to go to class, why not make it a little bit easier for them to get there?

 

 

 


[i] “Operating Budget and Plan FY 2013-2014,” Longwood University, September 25, 2013, http://www.longwood.edu/assets/budget/Operating_Plan_2013-2014.pdf

[ii] ”Farmville Area Bus Transit Development Plan: Fiscal Years 2010-2015,” Virginia Rail and Public Transportation, October 2009, http://www.drpt.virginia.gov/activities/files/Farmville %20Area%20Transit.pdf

[iii] “Longwood University unveils new bus,” Longwood University, October 8, 2012, http://www.longwood.edu/2012releases_44996.htm.

[iv] “MCI Pre-Owned Select,” Motor Coach Industries, October 31, 2013, http://sales.mcicoach.com/preowned/pcoach.nsf/SelectMake?openform.

Works Cited: 

“Operating Budget and Plan FY 2013-2014.” Longwood University. September 25, 2013. http://www.longwood.edu/assets/budget/Operating_Plan_2013-2014.pdf.

“Farmville Area Bus Transit Development Plan: Fiscal Years 2010-2015.” Virginia Rail and Public Transportation. October 2009. http://www.drpt.virginia.gov/activities/files/Farmville %20Area%20Transit.pdf.”

“Longwood University unveils new bus.” Longwood University. October 8, 2012. http://www.longwood.edu/2012releases_44996.htm.

“MCI Pre-Owned Select.” Motor Coach Industries. October 31, 2013. http://sales.mcicoach.com/preowned/pcoach.nsf/SelectMake?openform.

 

Lets Find a Solution

Kyle Phelps

            The issue that I have noticed while attending Longwood University for the past four years is the new freshman have a New Lancer Days experience and have to attend LSEM, a one credit class that you have to pass in order to graduate.  The current standing issue is transfer students arriving here at Longwood in the spring semester or a new freshman on campus, whom decided to wait a semester before coming to college. This unfortunate circumstance leaves them unable to find anything on campus, nor do they know what to expect here at Longwood University. This is all do to Longwood not providing an LSEM class or New Lancer Days in the spring semester.  Thus the students are “thrown” into college without any knowledge beforehand, knowledge about the school, the location of things on campus, or given a peer mentor to help guide/aide them in the beginning of their college years.  This may very well affect why Longwood only has a 42% four year graduation rate.

            Transfer students are encouraged to attend TransFORM in August of each year.  This program provides an extended one day orientation.  Students hear from Longwood administrators, representatives from Residential and Commuter Life, the Office of First year Experience and Family Programs, meet over brunch with a Peer Mentor, and have an opportunity to learn more about the Farmville community by visiting a community fair called “The Complete Lancer.”  See the thing about the TransFORM program is that it is only encouraged for the transfer student to attend and if they decide to go it is only a one day event.  Yes it is good that they have this program, but it has to be mandatory like it is for the new freshman fall class.  In addition, New Lancer Days is a four day event which tells me that there is no way that they can give four days worth of information in just one day, thus the transfer student not knowing as much as the freshman fall class. 

In order for each student to have the same level of preparedness there must be a mandatory four day even just like New Lancer Days for the transfer students to attend.  This would help out the transfer students in a big way and that leads to improving their academic and social skills which in the long run leads to a better four year graduation rate for Longwood University.

New transfer students should have to be attending a mandatory weekend event on their first weekend on campus so they can get acquainted with Longwood University.  In addition, if they feel like they need to take a class like LSEM they can if they want too.  There may be some resistance to this idea because some people may feel they already been in college and transferred here and should feel ready right when they get here but that is not always the case.

 

Blog #7: The Path to Fitness- Finding a Solution for a Trial Run Extension

Longwood University strives for it’s students to maintain a balance between mental and physical well-being and health. The Health and Wellness Center is designed to do just that! Many aspects of the center are great, even the fitness floor, which has a wonderful array of cardio and weight equipment. However, the fitness center could be improved in at least one way according to some: give us more hours!

Students have voiced their desire for longer hours in the fitness portion of the center, but no formal suggestion has ever been made about it. Some students deal with rigorous schedules here at Longwood and squeezing in exercise early in the morning or right between day-time classes just doesn’t work. Many of them, like myself, want to get it all done before moving on to our own needs. So, we end up putting exercise and any other personal activities on hold until we are done with school work. This usually leaves us free somewhere between 10pm and later. For those that like to frequent the gym later at night, the problem usually stems from lack of day-time availability. The reasons why some go to the gym late at night are fairly simple: health benefits and stress relief. People want to work off all those late night snack and D-Hall food, or they just need an outlet after staring at a textbook or writing a 10-page paper. It feels good to burn some calories and loosen up the muscles, and night-owls deserve the same opportunity that early birds have as well.

As a daily gym user, I understand first-hand the importance of getting a good workout in at least once a day. Without it, I feel sluggish and my anxiety disorder tends to make me antsy at times. Sometimes I go to the gym during the day, but sometimes I only have time at night. I can usually squeeze in my 35 minutes of high intensity cardio but on some days, like when I race back from my German tutoring job around 9pm to make it to the gym by at least 9:30 (gym closes at 10pm), I’m cutting it close. I hate worrying on some days that I’m not going to get my workout in- it’s one of the only things I have on campus that I consider quality time to myself. So, when I have to stress about fitting this in and racing against the clock, this bothers me. And, I imagine I am not the only one.

So, what’s the solution to the issue? We must demand longer hours! Not quite. 

Extending the gym’s hours is not something that can happen in a snap; it would take some strategical planning and honestly, a full-blown extension will never work without a trial-run first. We can’t expect the director’s over at the center to be 100% on board when there’s no real proof to back up the success of such an extension. A trial run is the most reasonable starting point. My proposed trial run would stand for only one week, from Monday-Thursday. The new hours would be from 6:30am-12am, instead of until 10pm.

I thought this was going to be a lot more difficult to launch into action, but after talking to one of the director’s over at the fitness center, Gus Hemmer, I was gladly surprised to hear that the trial run would not be such a big deal. There are at least 3 main issues in regards to the extension, and here I will propose 3 “solutions” to them. I quote the word because the problems really are not as complex as I assumed they would be.

In order to have longer hours the 3 things necessary are:

1) Money

2)Security

3)Staff

—Of course, you need people to use the gym as well but the whole point of the trial is to assess people’s usage of the center—

Solutions:

1) Money would not be such a massive issue. According to Mr. Hemmer, and based on my research of the facility already…the center is already energy efficient which cuts down on cost, and cost for power, etc. is already financially covered. Also, Mr. Hemmer said that the lights in the center already stay on until midnight, so having the fitness center open until 12 would not affect electrical costs. (Cost of employees is something I will include in the Staff section, #3)

2) Security would be helpful, although not required. Mr. Hemmer thought it would be a good idea to employ a Longwood police officer to check and watch over the building for the 2 hour extension. This would be of no additional cost to the school or students.

3) Additional staff would be necessary. However, the amount would only be 2 to keep the place running, plus a manager. The additional pay increase would only amount to $13o- that includes both people for one week of late-night work. Mr. Hemmer also admitted that the possibility for employees to resist later hours is possible but that the problem of finding willing workers is really not an issue. He mentioned that issues of scheduling usually arise from student-workers personal schedules, so those who go to class later usually don’t have a problem. Also, he says that he receives about 40 applications per submission period and that there is more than enough people and possibilities for working this shift.

Resistance becomes the biggest issue, as you can see, with relation to staffing which will be addressed in the next blog, but even the director thinks this problem is minimal.

There’s really not much to lose here except maybe 130 extra dollars that will go to hard working college students. If a trial run is feasible and possible, what’s the harm?

 

 

Megan Clements

Possible Solutions

Blog 7
By: Alison Tyler

The immediate problem I would like to focus on is how the issue of crime affects the teachers and students in Petersburg City schools. I feel that crime and poverty is the cause of teacher turnover in Petersburg. The effects of teacher turnover is that the students and schools do not have enough qualified teachers, without qualified teachers students may not accomplish the education they deserve. My position in this is that when I graduate from Longwood University I plan on teaching in a school near my home in Dinwiddie County. Petersburg City schools may be where I have to teach one day and I do not want this issue of crime and poverty to affect how I teach and how my students learn. I have stated the cause of teacher turnover and the effects from it and I do not want to be one of those teachers who leaves their job because of issues going on outside the school. I want to be there for my students and make sure they receive the best education possible.

My solution to this is issue is in two parts. The first solution may be more reasonable than my second solution and is geared towards the teachers and students and it is:

1. To make the schools a more secure place, meaning more security officers in schools, more security cameras, and more patrols outside of schools.

My second solution is a much broader solution, yet I still want to include it because it involves everyone in the community not just the teachers and students. It may be cheaper than my first solution but it will require a lot of time and effort and it is:

2. To have the community work together in reducing crime levels, meaning coming forward and giving a testimony if a crime was witnessed and helping in anyway to solve crimes.

Some may say that the first solution is to expensive and who is going to pay for it, but more security will not only comfort the teachers it will also comfort the students as well as the parents. More security officers in schools will help with any issues going on inside the school. Security cameras will help catch any violence or destruction going on around the schools. The patrols outside of schools will be to monitor and make sure no outside intruders come in.

Some may also disagree with the second solution because it could be dangerous or almost impossible to catch the bad guys. With efforts from everyone in the community crime would decrease because the bad guys would be afraid of being caught. Reducing crime would create a friendlier environment for everyone to live in as well as create a stress-free environment for teachers and students.

Solutions For the Bay (Blog #7)

A “mahogany tide” creeps toward shore. Algal blooms like these are the result of too much nitrogen in the water, causing the explosive growth of algae. Photo © 2010 Morgan Heim/iLCP

The Chesapeake Bay Program stated that close to one-quarter of the land located in the Chesapeake Bay watershed is focused on agricultural production. Agriculture is an important aspect to many people because it provides foods and fibers, natural area, and environmental benefits. Although agriculture provides us with important resources it also is the largest source of nutrient and sediment pollution to the Chesapeake Bay. These excess nutrients and sediments that are entering the bay enter from agricultural runoff. The main issue with agricultural runoff is the types of fertilizers farmers are using on their crops.

The fertilizers they are using are chemical ones which contain large amounts of phosphorus and nitrogen. Although the bay does need phosphorus and nitrogen to survive, large amounts that the bay is receiving are slowing damaging the bay and its wild life. According to the Chesapeake Bay program, these fertilizers contribute 42 percent of the nitrogen, 58 percent of the phosphorus and 58 perfect of the sediment that enters the bay. From 2010 estimates from the EPA, chemical fertilizers, in specific, account for 17 percent of the nitrogen and 19 percent of the phosphorus entering the bay. When this pollution enters the bay it forms algal blooms that are large and block sunlight from entering the bay. This decreases the amount of oxygen that forms and kills the underwater grasses. These areas in the bay have been labeled “dead zones”, where no oxygen forms, and are the locations where fish and shellfish also die and decompose. Aside from blocking oxygen, algal blooms also raise pH level in the waters which spreads and kills more bay life and prospers the growth of parasites. Besides killing bay life, pollution also affects these species in different ways.

I believe the Chesapeake Bay needs to be clear of polluted runoff and clean for the species living inside and outside of the bay to survive. Things are being done to help clean the bay but by health standards the pollution level in the bay is still in critical condition. In order to make the bay a cleaner and runoff free location different solutions have been suggested. “The five most cost-effective conservation practices include streamside buffers, streamside fencing, nutrient management plans, continuous no-till, and cover crops. These practices reduce the most amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus per dollar spent” (Chesapeake Bay Foundation). Each of these solutions have different methods in preventing run-off.

Streamside buffers are very large, at almost 35 feet wide on each side of the stream, and are used to filter and gather the runoff from fertilizers before entering waterways. Streamside fencing is a much different solution that surrounds farms with fences to prevent animals and their waste from entering rivers and streams. This solution helps reduce the pollution levels and also erosion as well. Nutrient management plans are a communication solution rather than a border like solution. These plans educate farmers on what fertilizers to use on crops that will least pollute waterways. Continuous no till is a solution that limits erosion and also decreases soil disturbances. By using the no till solution the soil’s health can improve and also its level to hold moisture. Cover crops are the final possible solution for farmers because these crops are planted to soak up the remaining fertilizer than could enter waterways.

To implement these solutions a few steps need to be taken.

  1. Farmers need to be informed of the solutions that are available for them to decrease their levels of pollution to the Chesapeake Bay.
  2. Farmers need to enforce these solutions and management practices as quickly as possible.
  3. The general public also needs to be informed of what solutions are available to help decrease the bay pollution as well. This could help decrease the pollution drastically.

Letters, flyers, emails, websites, and many other forms of communication can be created and sent to inform farmers of what they can do. Resistance may be seen from farmers who believe the chemical fertilizers they are using are the best for their crops. However, if they are properly informed that chemical fertilizers are not the best option for them then I believe solutions will be put forth. Bu educating the general public they can gain concerns as well and help the effort to clean the bay before it gets damaged any worse.

Valente, Jenna. “Ten Invasive Species of the Chesapeake Bay.” Chesapeake Bay Program. Chesapeake Bay Program, 22 Apr 2013. Web. 27 Sep 2013. <http://www.chesapeakebay.net/blog/post/ten_invasive_species_of_the_chesapeake_bay>.

“Chemical Contaminents.” Chesapeake Bay Program. Chesapeake Bay Program, n.d. Web. 27 Sep 2013. <http://www.chesapeakebay.net/issues/issue/chemical_contaminants>.

Staff, . “Dead Zones.” Chesapeake Bay Foundation. Chesapeake Bay Foundation, n.d. Web. 27 Sep 2013. <http://www.cbf.org/about-the-bay/maps/pollution/dead-zones>.

Like the Song Says… How to Save a Life

As it had been made clear, there is a severe lack is basic medical knowledge within Longwood University students. This is a problem because accidents and emergencies happen all the time, especially on college campuses. Longwood is no exception: major events like Oktoberfest and Spring Weekend are breeding grounds for a variety of medical emergencies to happen. The solution is simple; Longwood students need to be prepared for the medical emergencies that are most likely to occur on campus. This training would be best taught at the beginning of every year during New Lancer Days. All freshmen will be required to attend the seminar where basic bleeding control, CPR compressions, and treatment of alcohol poisoning will be taught.

The first step is to figure out when during New Lancer Days will this seminar be taught. Training would take approximately two hours to complete and will be interactive. The best time to include this training would be during the seminar “Lancer Safety” given by Chief Bob Beach. Information can be combined and integrated so that students can learn how to be safe on campus and how to help other students. It would add another hour to the seminar, but it would be beneficial for students. By adding it to another seminar that has already been worked into the schedule, there won’t be any major changes that will need to occur.

The second step is to specifically define what would be included in the training seminar. Bleeding control would include how to identify the different types of wounds and how to apply direct pressure to the wound itself. Instead of making students sit through an entire CPR certification meeting, students would instead be taught how to properly administer chest compressions to a patient who is suffering from a heart problem. Compressions have become much more important in the CRP chain because circulating the blood within a body is more life sustaining than breathing for the patient. As for alcohol poising, students will be taught how to deal with others who are vomiting because of the amount of alcohol they have ingested. Simply strap a book bag filled with clothes or jackets to the person’s back and make it tight enough so they cannot get out of it. Put the individual on their side in the shower or bathroom floor and leave them be. By placing the victim on their side, they will not breathe in their own vomit and suffocate on it. The book bag makes it impossible for that person to roll over. These simple techniques can help people, and make treatment easier for EMS professionals when they arrive on scene. It will be important to stress that 911 still needs to be called, but by training bystanders to act when an emergency first happens, the situation will become under control much faster.

This poster gives directions on how to help someone who is the victim of alcohol poisoning

The third step will be measuring the success of the program. This will be the most difficult part of the program because success would mean that students respond in the case of an emergency. This information can be gathered through interviews or surveys. While the 911 call rate should not change drastically, there may be less calls to accidental overdosing or vomiting due to alcohol poisoning. What would be important to remember is that this seminar is not meant to be and EMT class. This training is meant to simply begin the proper treatment that needs to be administered to a victim on an emergency. This training seminar will not only make Longwood a safer place, it will also overflow into every town, city, and county that Longwood students call home.

But What About Our Children? (Blog 6)

Team No Kid Hungry

Too many children are forced to deal with hunger!

Hunger and poverty is an evident societal problem that can be seen throughout Farmville and Prince Edward County. More specifically, this complex problem is having major negative effects on the child population of Farmville and Prince Edward County, especially their education. For a large portion of the students within the Farmville/Prince Edward County school system, the school-based nutrition programs are the only form of nutrition assistance they receive. Within Farmville, the number of students receiving free meals is about four times higher than the number receiving only reduced-rate meals. It is unclear what exactly this relationship means, but seems to perhaps indicate that some kind of need is not being met by the federal SNAP program or that there is a far greater need within Farmville.

There are many issues that hunger causes that affect a child’s health and education. Children are considered to be the most obvious victims because “children who are poorly nourished suffer up to 160 days of illness each year” (“2013”). This just comes to show that children are the easiest targets in the eyes of hunger. Another big side effect that hunger has on children is their education and ability to learn. The chronic stress it puts on the children negatively affects their memory and concentration, which increases the achievement gap between the low-income African American and Hispanic children, and the Caucasian children. According to the American Psychological Association, “inadequate education contributes to the cycle of poverty by making it more difficult for low-income children to lift themselves and future generations out of poverty” (“Effects”).

A student will be denied his or her complete educational experience if they are having to sit through class on an empty stomach because their complete attention and focus is not on learning. Children who do not eat breakfast either zone out during class, fall asleep, or become lethargic. Some other characteristics of hungry students include not being able to understand assignments; losing materials needed for school that are given out by the teacher; not wanting to participate in class; they do not progress academically on time; or they can become depressed.

This is a collage I put together with some visualizations of different effects hunger can have on a child’s education. The pictures represent failing assignments, a frustrated student, a sleeping student, and lastly, a student who is zoned-out in class.

Too often, the only meals that a child will receive during an entire week’s time are the ones that are provided at school. In Prince Edward County, Virginia, there are 2,442 students are enrolled in School Nutrition Programs. Of those students, 66.31%, or 1,606 students, accept free or reduced lunches, with 9.54% qualified for reduced lunches and 56.77% qualified for free lunches (“Free”). This percentage of students calculates to two-thirds of the student body being eligible for some sort of food assistance. For the 2010-2011 school year, Prince Edward County Elementary School had not only the most School Nutrition Program members, at 1,062, but also the most eligible members for free or reduced meals at 724, when compared to the rest of Virginia (Grimes).

In Farmville, of the approximate 1,244 children living in households qualified to accept federal help, only 48.47% of them live in a residence that engages in other federal programs such as Food Stamps or SNAP (Bishaw). Given that there are an estimated 1,244 individuals under 18 years of age determined to be living in poverty and assuming a poverty distribution similar to the general population, it can be estimated that there are 646 children living below 185% of the poverty level and 519 children living below 130% of the poverty level. This would suggest that in Farmville, There are an estimated 519 students receiving free meals and 127 additional students receiving reduced-rate meals (Bishaw).

Works Cited

“2013 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics.” World Hunger Education Service, n.d. Web. 25 Oct 2013. <http://worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm>.

Bishaw, A. 2012. “Poverty: 2010 and 2011.” American Community Survey Briefs: U.S. Census Bureau, p.1-8.

“Effects of Poverty, Hunger, and Homelessness of Children and Youth.” American Psychological Association. American Psychological Association, n.d. Web. 25 Oct 2013. <http://www.apa.org/pi/families/poverty.aspx?item=2>.

“Free and Reduced Priced Eligibility Report-Division Level.” 2012-2013 National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Virginia Department of Education, 15 Feb 2013. Web. Oct 28 2013. <http://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/nutrition/statistics/free_reduced_eligibility/2012-2013/divisions/frpe_div_report_sy2012-13.pdf>.

Grimes, Catherine Digilio. Department of Education. Department of Education, 2010. Web. 27 Oct 2013. <http://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/nutrition/regulations/director_memos/2010-2011/04.pdf>.

Abstract (#5)

Longwood university a school full of history and great values, home of four national sororities (Zeta Tau Alpha, Sigma Sigma Sigma, Alpha Gamma Delta, and Alpha Sigma Alpha). Longwoods community is full of Greek life, and it plays a  big part with it’s culture. A problem has surged at Longwood University concerning greek life, there are two types of greek organizations. Those who are recognized by Longwood also know as “on-campus” and non recognized as “off-campus”. Currently there are six “off-campus organizations”. The reason’s why this organizations are of campus are the following two of them are local organizations, who have never done anything wrong but have not been able to be recognized, for circumstances such as not have a national board to back them up. Two other organizations were on-campus organizations, but were kicked out for risk management issues and hazing. Another organization got recolonized by their national chapter, when the people of this organization were not invited to re colonize the organization they made their own. The last organization has been off-campus since a long time ago, and there’s many rumors as why they are off campus. From hazing to crazy events.

Longwood has to deal with this situation, how ever in the past they have taken an aggressive approach. Rather than being inclusive they have tried to terminate them, treating them almost like gangs and excluding them from being part of the Longwood culture at times. This ranges from not being able to have their pledge rush with other Fraternities, to not members have positions in SGA and Honors board. There is possible solutions for these off-campus organizations, and each one should be treated as an individual case and not all of them as a whole.