Dec 01

#TechTipThursday: Managing a student’s Incomplete in your Canvas class

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As we approach the end of a semester and receive many inquiries on the subject, today’s post focuses on course completion. There may be any number of reasons why a student is unable to complete the requirements of an academic course. Fortunately, instructors have the option of granting students an “incomplete” grade in the course. This option, familiar to students and instructors alike, enables the student and instructor to develop an alternative timeline for completing course requirements. Specific policies governing the resolution of an “incomplete” grade may be found in the appropriate catalog (undergraduate catalog or graduate catalog). This post will focus on the management of an “incomplete” through Canvas: identifying common adjustments that need to be made so a student is able to complete learning activities outside of the class term.

 

Extend access to Canvas course
If your student has to complete assignments in a course that has ended, you are able to change the course end dates, but only if the term has not ended (fall 2016 terms ends on 12/31). You can do this from the ‘Settings’ tab in the left-hand course navigation. After navigating to the settings tab (1), you will see boxes for the start and end dates (2). Once the date has been chosen, be sure to check the box (3), which overrides the term dates. If the term has ended, contact the DEC for assistance changing your end date.

extending-access-to-canvas-course

Create due dates for individual students
Enhancing efficiency, instructors don’t need to recreate assignments to accommodate a student’s “incomplete.” Identify the assignment in question and edit its details. You can add additional due date information, for separate groups of students (i.e., Joe and Mary each has an “I” in your course. You can have Joe’s assignment due on 12/27 and Mary’s on 12/28) in the assignment settings (1) just below the due date you identified for your course.

adding-assignment-times-and-due-dates

After you click “+ Add” you will see additional “Assign” boxes; you may create as many as necessary. To “assign to,” start typing the name of the student.

Changing quiz settings
Using the ‘Moderate this Quiz’ function (highlighted with the blue box below), you can add time (whole number increments only) to a specific student. This option can be found once you have chosen a quiz that has been previously published in Canvas.

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Locate the student and select the pencil icon next to their name (1). A dialogue box, “Student Extensions” shown immediately below “Moderate Quiz,” will then appear. Here you can add extra attempts and additional time to a student’s quiz. Remember to save these changes!

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Using past test/quiz questions to create a new test/quiz

With the question banks feature you can create a new assessment using questions from previous tests/quizzes. When you create a quiz, unless you pull questions from an existing question bank, Canvas sorts the questions into an Unfiled Question Bank. Create the quiz as you would any other but follow the steps below to pull questions from your existing question banks.

Once you choose to add questions from a group/question bank (1), you will see a screen like the one below (2).

question-bank-1

Here, it is important to choose how many questions you want Canvas to pull from the question bank. In addition, you can select how many points each question is worth. You will choose the “Link to a Question Bank” option to display a list of previously saved questions. After you have chosen the desired question bank, typically from the Unfiled Question Bank, select the create group option which places those questions into the quiz.

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The questions are grouped by which assessment they appeared in. You can add questions in two ways:

  1. You can choose a group and Canvas will add all of the questions in the group (unless you specified otherwise in the preceding step); or
  2. You can choose specific questions from various questions banks by choosing the option to “View Course Question Banks” located in the top right of dialogue box shown below; this box appears after choosing to link the quiz to a question bank.  

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Once you choose to view course question banks a list of your question banks will appear as shown below. Choose the group from your list from which you wish to import quiz questions.

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The questions from the specific bank you selected will appear. To the right of those questions you will see the options shown below; choose to move multiple questions.

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You will see a dialogue box like the one below. You can then choose the specific questions at the top (1) and the destination exam, at the bottom (2). If you need questions from multiple question banks you can repeat this process until you have all the desired questions in the destination exam. We always recommend previewing your quiz to make sure all questions are there, the point values are set correctly, and the formatting is easy for students to read.

question-banks-final

If you have any questions, or difficulty duplicating the steps detailed in this post, please contact the Digital Education Collaborative.

Nov 17

#TechTipThursday: Change with TurnItIn for Instructors

TTT_DEClogoLongwood University uses TurnItIn, primarily within Canvas, to assess student submissions for originality. In other words, TurnItIn functions as a plagiarism-checker for any assignment in which the instructor has enabled TurnItIn and is submitted to Canvas. Although instructors have the ability to submit any student work through TurnItIn’s website, that is rarely done. *Note: the account administrator can assist any instructor who wishes to submit student work directly via TurnItIn. Please contact the DEC for further assistance.

To improve the efficiency of the TurnItIn/Canvas integration, Instructure Canvas advised all account holders to make a slight behind-the-scenes adjustment; we will do so on Monday 11/28/16. This change impacts the way in which instructors enable TurnItIn for a Canvas-based assignment. Today’s post will detail the steps needed to require that assignments submitted to Canvas are, jointly, submitted to TurnItIn.

  1. From your course homepage, click on “Assignments” from the left-hand course navigation menu tii1
  2. Once in “Assignments,” select the blue ” + Assignment” button at the top right 
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  3. You will see familiar assignment options – the only difference is the checkbox to “enable TurnItIn” for the assignment has been removed. To require TurnItIn for the assignment in question you will need to change the submission type to “External Tool” tii3
  4. Once you select “External Tool,” you will see the option to enter or find an External Tool URL. Select the Find option to the right of this text entry box tii4
  5. In the window that opens, scroll down the list and select “TurnItIn” (1) and then click “Select” (2) tii5

The above steps will enable TurnItIn for an assignment. You can continue to adjust the assignment’s settings before saving and publishing. Note that both instructors and students will see a new user interface when accessing an assignment that requires TurnItIn.

As an instructor, you’ll see this new interface when you access a TurnItIn-enabled assignment by clicking on the assignment’s name. For information on how TurnItIn has changed for students please see a related post written specifically for students. When you access an assignment with the TurnItIn LTI enabled, you will see a screen with your assignment inbox. tii6At the top of the new Canvas/TurnItIn interface you will find a “Settings” (1) option, which can be used to change settings specific to TurnItIn (i.e., portions of the paper to check; sources against which the assignment will be compared; etc.). You can access Canvas’ assignment editing interface through the “Edit Assignment Settings” button  (2) on the right side of the inbox. You can access Canvas’ Speed Grader on the right hand side through the Speed Grader button (3). picture1

If you have any questions, or difficulty duplicating the steps detailed in this post, please contact the Digital Education Collaborative.

This post was drafted with assistance from Paige, an Instructional Technology Collaborator.

Nov 17

#TechTipThursday: Change with TurnItIn for Students

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Longwood University uses TurnItIn, within Canvas, to assess student submissions for originality. In other words, TurnItIn is a plagiarism-checker for any assignment in which the instructor has enabled TurnItIn and is submitted to Canvas. To improve the efficiency of the TurnItIn/Canvas integration, Instructure Canvas advised all account holders to make a slight behind-the-scenes adjustment; we will do so on Monday 11/28/16. This change impacts the way you will interact with assignments which require TurnItIn and today’s post will detail the new student user interface for these assignments.

There are a variety of ways for you to access your assignments in a Canvas course. Regardless of how you access the assignment, we begin the post by demonstrating how to submit an assignment that requires TurnItIn.

  1. Once you have selected the assignment you will see the TurnItIn Assignment interface. In the center of the screen, find and select the blue “Upload Submission” button picture1
  2. In the window that appears, give your submission a title and select the blue “Select a file to upload” button picture2
  3. Select the file you would like to upload from your computer. Once the file uploads you will see it on your Assignment Dashboard. Once your submission has been checked for originality, you will be able to see your score through this interface picture3

If you have any questions, or difficulty duplicating the steps detailed in this post, please contact the Digital Education Collaborative.

This post was drafted with assistance from Paige, an Instructional Technology Collaborator.

Oct 20

#TechTipThursday: InDesign (CC) – A Beginner’s Guide (Part 2)

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Last week we introduced you to Adobe InDesign, the industry leading software for typographic layout and image placement. What makes this program increasingly useful is its user- and design-friendly interface, particularly once you’ve learned your way around the software. For a review of how to get started with InDesign, please see last week’s #TechTipThursday.

This week’s post aims to expand your deepen your knowledge of, and expand your skill set with, Adobe InDesign. Some of the concepts addressed by this post may not be immediately relevant to your use of the program but may become increasingly useful as your level of familiarity and design needs change.

Understanding Links with Text and Objects

Learn what linking an object means, and how to update and create links between objects in InDesign

Watch the video!

Understanding Layers

Learn how to utilize layers in your design and how to manipulate and customize those layers to make your design process as smooth and efficient as possible.

Watch the video!

Look Like a Pro Using Shortcuts

Learn the keyboard commands for frequently used functions in InDesign. This skill will make your design process a breeze and make you look like a pro!

Watch the video!

Prepare for Printing

Learn how to export your finished masterpiece as a high quality PDF document that is suitable for printing. Also, learn how to create and save PDF preset options for exporting quickly.

Watch the video!

Packaging your files

Learn what it means to package your file and how to appropriately name, package, and save the bundle of files that make up your document (fonts, images, InDesign Document, logos, pdf, etc). The Package command keeps everything in one place and is perfect for when you need to share your work with other designers.

Watch the video!

The tutorials for these topics, in order, have been helpful as other members of our team learn to use this software. If you have any questions, or difficulty duplicating the steps detailed in this post, please contact the Digital Education Collaborative.

*This post was drafted by Erin, an Instructional Technology Collaborator.

Oct 13

#TechTipThursday: InDesign (CC) – A Beginner’s Guide (Part 1)

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The industry leading page design and layout program allows you to create, manipulate, and publish everything from printed books and brochures to digital magazines, interactive elements, posters, and even e-books and apps. The great thing about Adobe InDesign is that it really is as user-friendly and design-friendly as possible once you know your way around the software. It works seamlessly with other adobe products such as Photoshop and Illustrator to make your design multi-dimensional and as creatively efficient as possible.

InDesign is a layout program from Adobe that graphic designers use to combine text and images. It is the leading software for typographic layout and image placement. Although it may be a little daunting to learn at first, this 2-part series will help you pick it up quickly and you’ll never go back to laying out your graphics and type in other programs.

First Steps: Setting up your InDesign document

Learn how to set up your document using the appropriate settings that well help you create and see exactly what you are designing

Watch the video! 

The Basics: Using the Tools

Learn about the basic tools you will utilize, manipulate, and interact with when you create your design.

Watch the video!

Placing Objects, Text, and Frames

Learn how to create, place, and manipulate frames, text, and images in InDesign.

Watch the video!

Adding Pages to your Document

Learn how to utilize the Pages panel in InDesign to make a single page or multi-page document or spreads.

Watch the video!

Applying Color

Learn how to add a fill or stroke color to any object in InDesign. Discover how to add and select swatches and to change the stroke style, weight, and type on any particular object.

Watch the video!

The tutorials for these topics, in order, have been helpful as other members of our team learn to use this software. If you have any questions, or difficulty duplicating the steps detailed in this post, please contact the Digital Education Collaborative.

*This post was drafted by Erin, an Instructional Technology Collaborator.

Sep 29

#TechTipThursday: Speechnotes

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Speechnotes is a free online notepad that allows you to record your thoughts by speaking them into your computer’s microphone in addition to typing. This is intended to be a tool that allows you to dictate your speeches or papers to your computer so you can ensure that they will have the same natural flow that you will have when speaking. While recording, you can speak or type specific punctuation marks to format your sentences. While this is not the intended purpose, you can also use this to record lectures in text form, as a transcript of sorts; the software does not automatically add punctuation so it won’t be formatted. However, since this software can run in the background without any user input, it can still be a useful tool to help capture a lecture in addition to normal notes or other methods. You can also use this tool to capture your dictated speeches or papers while you do research simultaneously. This post offers an introduction to using Speechnotes.

To access Speechnotes, visit https://speechnotes.co/.

  1. To being, click in the box that contains greyed out instructions and start typing or click the red microphone and start speaking. speech11
    1. While speaking, you can say any of the following to add punctuation marks. speech2
    2. If you say a sentence that happens to include one of the above words (such as “This painting is from the Classical period”), the software will do its best to figure out whether it is supposed to be represented as a word or the punctuation mark.
  2. Once you finish your work, there are a variety of methods you can use to save your data. The two paper icon in the bottom-right corner of the test area allows you to copy your text to the clipboard so you can paste it into a separate document. speech31
    1. The left-hand menu features several different icons, discussed below from the top to bottom.
      1. The gear icon gives you a few options, most notably including an option to change your language. speech4
    2. The “+ paper” icon starts a new session, clearing your current data. If auto-save is enabled the data will automatically be save and can be reopened if you need to access it again.  speechplus
    3. The folder icon allows you to open previous saved sessions. speech5
    4. The mail icon allows you to send what you’ve recorded as an e-mail. speech6
    5. The file to folder icon gives you several options for exporting your file, including uploading it to your Google Drive account, downloading it as a .txt file, downloading it as a .doc file, and saving it internally. speech7
    6. The printer icon lets you print your file. speech8
    7. The “+” and “- magnifying glass” icons change the size of the text recorded on your screen. speechmag

 

If you have any questions, or difficulty duplicating the steps detailed in this post, please contact the Digital Education Collaborative.

*This post was drafted by Michael, an Instructional Technology Collaborator.

Sep 22

#TechTipThursday: Taking Notes in the PowerPoint App

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Instructors’ frequently use PowerPoint to convey course material, whether in an online, hybrid or face-to-face class. As is likely the case at other institutions, Longwood University instructors often share lecture notes in advance of a class session. When taking notes for class, it can be helpful to type in the notes section or type directly into the slide, but sometimes it would be really helpful to annotate directly on the slide. If you download the PowerPoint app on an iPad and log in with Longwood Live email credentials, you can draw directly on the slide and save those annotations. This post provides direction on how students can take notes and annotate directly on PowerPoint slides, using the iOS app.

To begin you will access the Canvas app to download a PowerPoint file to your device.

  1. When you locate the file you need, tap on the “share” icon and then tap “copy to PowerPoint” 1
  2. When the PowerPoint opens in the app, you will need to click “Duplicate” in order to make edits. 2
  3. You can save the PowerPoint to your iPad, OneDrive through Longwood, DropBox, etc. (not GoogleDrive)3
  4. Then, click on the “Draw” tab and you can select the pen, highlighter, or eraser and different colors and sizes45
  5. Lastly, if you need to share the PowerPoint with different people, or email it to yourself, click the “Add People” icon button send a copy. All annotations/drawings save when you navigate away from PowerPoint.6

If you have any questions, or difficulty duplicating the steps in this post, please contact the Digital Education Collaborative.

This post was drafted by Kelsey Dunbar, Graduate Assistant, Digital Education Collaborative.

Sep 15

#TechTipThursday: Apple VoiceOver

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Apple’s VoiceOver utility scans and reads everything on the screen so you can navigate through your phone, iPad, or computer without having the look at the screen. The main and original purpose for the VoiceOver setting in iOS/OS X is for accessibility for those with limited vision. While you may not need to use VoiceOver for its intended purpose, it can be helpful for other purposes. If you have an eBook, you can turn on VoiceOver and it can read the book out loud to you; this can be helpful with audiobooks, for example. Another task VoiceOver can help with is studying. If you create a study guide, you can have VoiceOver read your study guide while you are driving or doing other tasks during which you can’t read. Further, the auditory input of your study guide is a good way to rehearse the information. This post offers an introduction to VoiceOver. The specific steps and accompanying screenshots demonstrate enabling this utility on a mobile device.

To access:

  1. Access your device’s “Settings”
  2. Tap on “General” 1
  3. Tap on “Accessibility” 2
  4. Tap on “VoiceOver” 3
  5. Tap on the toggle switch next to “VoiceOver” to turn it on 5
  6. You will then see a box around each app as VoiceOver scans everything. You can also tap on the app that you want to open to get the box around that app. When you want to open the app, double click the app. 6
  7. When you open a full page of text, scroll down with 2 fingers to have VoiceOver read over the entire page continuously; it will automatically move onto the next page. untitled7

For more information on VoiceOver, please click here for iOS or here for OS X. If you have any questions, or difficulty duplicating the steps in this post, please contact the Digital Education Collaborative.

This post was drafted by Kelsey Dunbar, Graduate Assistant, Digital Education Collaborative.

Sep 08

#TechTipThursday: Recording & sharing a voice track with GarageBand

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GarageBand is software exclusive to Mac OS X and iOS that allows user to create music and podcasts. This post will provide a quick overview of how to record your voice and share the voice track with others.

After opening GarageBand, you will be welcomed by a window that will prompt you to choose what kind of project you would like to create. Since we will be recording voice we will actually select “Empty Project.” Note: do not select “Voice” unless you are a seasoned user. gb1

In the new window, make sure the microphone is selected. Also be sure the appropriate options are selected for the input. For the sake of this post, we will be recording “Input 1” through the “Built-in Microphone.”gb2

To change the input or output device, click either of the two gray arrows as highlighted in the picture below. gb3

A new window will appear (see below) for you to change the input and output devices. After you’ve finished making changes, click the red “X” in the top left-hand corner of the window to return to the previous screen.gb4

Once you’ve returned to the original screen, click the “Create” button. Untitled

Before recording, change the “Display Mode” from “Beats & Project” to “Time,” as demonstrated in the following screenshots. gb6gb7

This change will enable your display to read in seconds, minutes, and hours. Untitled2

To record your voice you will click the red button immediately to the left of the “time” display.gb9

The playhead will begin to move and you will be able see the progression of your voice track’s recording. gb10

When you have finished recording click the stop button. The voice track will go from being red to blue. gb11

If you are satisfied with your recording, you’re ready to export the track. Click “Share” from the horizontal menu at the top of the window, and then select “Export Song to Disk.” gb12

You will be prompted to select the preferred file type, as well as the destination location, for your voice track. gb13

GarageBand has many other features and capabilities that we did not review in this post. For more information on how to use GarageBand, please view this list of tutorials. If you have any questions, or difficulty duplicating the steps in this post, please contact the Digital Education Collaborative.

This post was drafted by Xavier Harrison, a former Instructional Technology Collaborator (Longwood ’16)

May 31

Learning Lab Show | Ep. 17 Graduate View of EdTech

In this episode, Jenny is joined by special guest, graduate student, Meredith Peck to discuss how educational technology affects the graduate school experience.

 

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