3 ways Cartoon Network’s “Steven Universe” promotes happy LGBT relationships

3 ways Cartoon Network’s “Steven Universe” promotes happy LGBT relationships

Steven Universe is one of the newest animated cartoons to hit Cartoon Network. However it is also the most radical, creative, and stereotype-breaking show in the network’s history. For the first time ever, Cartoon Network has a confirmed LGBT relationship with two of the show’s newest characters, Ruby and Sapphire. Here are the three reasons ways the show promotes happy LGBT relationships through the use of their characters, and one epic song. Steven Universe is a television, animated cartoon show that follows a young boy named Steven as he grows up and fights along side the Crystal Gems. Rebecca Sugar, known for her previous work with Cartoon Network’s other hit show Adventure Time, created the show. Turner Broadcasting System, through Time Warner, owns Cartoon Network and has skyrocketed in ratings and views with this addition to their lineup. The show’s audience is for “teens and tweens” (and even college students) of both genders. With the main characters hosting strong females as well as a goofy younger boy the show can appeal to both genders. Steven Universe is constantly breaking barriers with its tough girl characters, bi-racial and LGBT relationships, as well as promoting educated female roles. As explained in Wired, within the show there are multiple lessons taught and great character depictions that eliminate stereotypes. Despite the fact that it is an animated cartoon airing on a children’s network, the show doesn’t let those “limitations” eliminate its creativity. Unlike other shows within the network, it actually has a story line with deep moments within them that allow viewers to connect with the characters. Ruby and Sapphire fuse to create Garnet...
Truck me: Chevrolet’s Super Bowl commercial reminds what it means to be a man

Truck me: Chevrolet’s Super Bowl commercial reminds what it means to be a man

Driving around in a pick-’em-up truck How can you tell the difference between a man and a real man? Apparently it is by what vehicle they drive. During the 2015 Super Bowl Chevrolet decided they would define what it really means to be a man, based upon other’s perceptions. Their idea of a man isn’t anything new and unsurprisingly it has to do with a man and his truck. What’s in the commercial? The commercial is one of a series Chevy created centered around the same idea, a focus group of “real people” of all age and gender demographics were brought in and shown two similar images: a man standing next to a red truck and another image of the same man standing next to a car. In this commercial, the focus survey members are children and are asked what sort of pet the two men might have. Sure enough, the children pick cooler animals for the man standing next to the truck; even a “rattlesnake” is suggested. The man standing next to the car gets the less manly pet option of having “birds.” Who’s the focus? This commercial is aimed towards men, clearly puts the pressure on them that in order to be a man they must have a truck (specifically Chevrolet’s trucks). “The Selling of Masculinity” explains that many advertisers connect towards similar ideas of what being a man is: “aggressive” and “hypersexual.” The “aggressive” aspect is that men in social constructions (like an advertisement) are depicted with strong, physical power be it with their taller and muscular physique or with objects that support this such as power...
Introduction Post

Introduction Post

  Hello all, My name is Carly Shaia; I am a sophomore Communication Studies major with a concentration in Mass Media and a minor in Photography. I am heavily involved with the campus radio station, WMLU, as a DJ and a board member. This semester I have two shows: Striking The Chord, which plays acoustic music, and Getting Crafty, which is a talk show about crafts with classmate Jessica Gangitano. I am also heavily involved the campus newspaper, The Rotunda, as their opinions editor. Out of all the key questions, the fourth question is the one that I find the most interesting to research and understand: “What values, lifestyles, and points of view are represented in or are omitted from this message?” This is really the meat and potatoes of an advertisement, or rather can be the rice. By rice, I mean it can go unnoticed but really expand when beginning to digest it. The “values” within a message are what the brain secondly interprets after the immediacy of the more obvious “techniques” and perhaps what company creates the message. Take the B Classic advertisement: Initially all one sees are beautiful woman seductively dancing around iconic landscapes throughout Asia. However, the advertisement is effective in that one is also listening to classical music throughout the video, and is informed it is for festival promoting classical music. It also shows that the one’s attention is more drawn towards the provocative dancers than perhaps the main, but underlying, message of the video. I hope to learn in Media Criticism how to fully see all parts of a message’s intent, in any...